Public Comments to Port Metro Vancouver on coal export expansion

(Note: many more letters still to be added!)

The Port Authority, though tasked to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians," sees no obligation to consult the general public nor transparently record our concerns about coal export expansion.

This is neither reasonable nor fair, so until the situation changes we will keep an open record of public concerns here. Below, resident's comments sent to the Port Authority and cc'd to us, earliest first.

If you would like to send your own letter to the port, go here.

To the Board of Port Metro Vancouver,

Responsibility for climate change doesn't stop at our borders - even Premier Christy Clark has acknowledged this publicly. I am writing to you today to ask you to consider the future health and safety of all British Columbians, and not just short term economic interests, in your decision-making process. Wherever coal is being burned it is destabilizing our climate and the life support system of our entire planet. This is not some future possibility. It is happening now, and the human and economic cost is already enormous. Exporting coal out of Port Metro Vancouver facilities makes absolutely no sense, and increasing our capacity to export more coal out of Port Metro facilities to be burned in Asia or anywhere is irresponsible.

I am writing to ask the board to 1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) these proposals and their scale, 3) engage the public by developing a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts and risks into the decision making process for all proposals.

I look forward to your response.

Jane Kilthei, Cowichan Bay, B.C.

Dear People

Last May Premier Clark (as reported in the Globe & Mail) stated that responsibility for climate change doesn't stop at our borders. The two new plans to export coal out of Port Metro Vancouver make absolutely no sense.

Who gets to decide if it's worth putting our future at risk to export more coal? Right now, not the people of BC, or an independent and unbiased expert panel -- just the staff at Port Metro Vancouver.

Your coal export plans must take into account the extreme ecological sensitivity of the Salish Sea; the marine environment is home to marine mammals, their food, and our food too. Coal dust kills. You must also consult with First Nations. And to do all of this in a openly honest and transparent way.

So please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors ,

  1. Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.
  2. Take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.
  3. Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.
  4. Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Yours truly,

Dr. Katherine Dunster, Denman Island, B.C.

To the Board of Directors, Port Metro Vancouver:

I am very concerned to hear of the proposed plan to significantly expand a coal port in Surrey. A project of this significance demands much more open and accountable public consultation process.

I am strongly opposed to any plan to export global warming pollution out of the Lower Mainland. According to the International Energy Agency, two-thirds of the known reserves of the world's coal, oil and gas should remain underground to have 50 percent chance of staying below the 2 degree C limit of global warming.[1] If we want 75 percent chance, we have to leave 80 percent of these reserves under the soil. [2]

I urge you to immediately take the following steps:

  1. 1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,
  2. 2) take effort to inform the public of the scale of these proposals, (not just neighbours),
  3. 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and
  4. 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Sincerely,

Ruth Walmsley, Burnaby, BC

[1] International Energy Agency: No more than one-third of proven reserves of fossil fuels can be consumed prior to 2050 if the world is to achieve the 2 degree C goal, World Energy Outlook 2012,

[2] The current proven reserves of oil, coal and gas all together have a potential of 2,795 gigatons of CO2, which is five times more than the 565 gigatons budget. This implies that at least 2,230 gigatons of CO2of proven reserves of oil, coal and gas should be kept where they are and not be burned. http://www.carbontracker.org/carbonbubble

For the attention of the Board of Directors: no coal export expansion

As there has been NO ACTION to mitagate greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, Please DO NOT approve any further development of coal ports or Gateway facilities until we have returned to safe levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Bob Worcester, Vancouver, BC

Dear Board Members,

I am disturbed to learn that the board is considering developments that would substantially accelerate global climate change. We need to be doing all that we can to reduce the use of fossil fuels globally and I respectfully request that you delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals. It is important the the citizens of British Columbia be informed of the scale of these proposals. I believe that you will find that British Columbians do not want to be major exporters of global warming. Please take an explicit accounting of the amount of carbon that will be added to our atmosphere when the new coal exports are ultimately burned, and then consider the degrees of global warming that will be attributable to these exports. If the board includes an honest accounting of the environmental harm, I am confident that those of you with children or grandchildren will not want to see the developments go forward.

Sincerely,

Lynne Quarmby, Ph.D. Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University

To the Directors of the Port Planning Board:

I am writing to you with deep concern regarding your upcoming ruling over possibly expanding coal exports in the Port of Vancouver. We simply cannot allow expansion of fossil fuel exports. It is our moral responsibility to contribute to finding solutions to the causes of global warming and this is an extremely critical aspect of that. If you allow Vancouver to operate the largest coal port in the world, it will be a blight on our city, on our global reputation, and will hasten our planet's demise. As you can see from recent public demonstrations, the citizens of this province have made their opinions very clear about the role of our city and province as global leaders in environmental responsibility.

I ask that you solicit public input on this decision, and in order to do that, that you delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals. A decision of such magnitude requires public input and accountability. There is an increasing awareness in Vancouver, in Canada, and around the world that municipalities bear a burden of responsibility to ensure they are doing what they can to stop harmful greenhouse gas emissions. I urge you to incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for your consideration. This is a landmark decision and I truly hope that you consider all of the implications.

Sincerely,

Dr. Esther Verheyen

Dear Sir/Madam

Exporting more coal will destroy our kids' future. So please re-consider any plans for expanding coal export terminals in the greater Vancouver area.

Science facts tell us that we will destroy our climate if we burn most of the rest of the fossil fuel reserves on this planet. Specifically, Dr. Jim Hansen has written, along with many other eminent scientists and economists, that we must reduce our carbon emissions by 6% a year in order to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts. And finally, the International Energy Assc. - a group funded by governments, not environmentalists - has warned that all countries must reduce their carbon emissions drastically - this makes economic sense if you understand the potential impacts of climate change.

I request that you delay any decision on coal exports, allow open public hearings on this issue, and get a scientific review of the issues surrounding the breakdown of our climate and the burning of fossil fuels.

Sincerely, Peter Nix, Maple Bay, BC

Dear all,

I am writing to express my opposition to the creation of new or expansion of old coal ports in metro Vancouver or Texada Island. The two new proposals for coal ports on the Fraser River and in North Vancouver do not jive with the need and desire of BC residents to reduce GHGs. Even though the coal may be from elsewhere and is going elsewhere, these ports promote the burning of this coal.

Saying that we are not culpable in the increased GHG production is like a port in Senegal 200 years ago saying that they were not responsible for slavery since they just deal in the free trade of slaves but don't actually use the slaves for work. Seattle has blocked coal export and so can BC.

At least the Northern Gateway and the Kinder Morgan project are going through a public review. This project, equivalent in its CO2 output, should NOT be approved without a full public review.

Please be reasonable and do the right thing for the future of the planet.

Sincerely,

Rosemary Cornell, Professor, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, SFU

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Please do not proceed with plans to expand Coal exports. It does not take much time or effort to study the situation our world is in re Global Warming to make a true informed decision which affects the future of this planet. If you have children and/or grand children the issue should be even more important to you. We are at a critical point in this planet's future. If you refuse to investigate the effects of burning coal I feel sorry for you and the rest of mankind. Thank you.

Stephen Garnett, Cowichan Bay, BC.

A 54 year old concerned citizen of planet earth. And yes I have children.

Dear Board of Port Metro Vancouver;

The following two paragraphs were excerpted from an article published today by journalist Chris Hedges.

"According to a report commissioned by the World Bank, humans must immediately implement a series of radical measures to halt carbon emissions or prepare for the collapse of entire ecosystems and the displacement, suffering and death of hundreds of millions of the globe's inhabitants. "Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4 degree C Warmer World Must Be Avoided," was written for the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and Climate Analytics and published last week.

"The continued failure to respond aggressively to climate change, the report warns, will mean that the planet will inevitably warm by at least 4 degrees Celsius by the end of the century, ushering in an apocalypse. "The political and corporate elites in the industrialized world continue, in spite of overwhelming scientific data, to place short-term corporate profit and expediency before the protection of human life and the ecosystem. The fossil fuel industry is permitted to determine our relationship to the natural world, dooming future generations."

Your comment below (from today's Vancouver Sun) sounds rational at first glance but fails to recognize or acknowledge the scale of the issue we are faced with:

"Port Metro Vancouver has no jurisdiction over issues such as greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of coal. We are quite progressive on the environmental front as much as possible but there are some constraints," said Patricia MacNeil, communications adviser at the port. "We don't select the commodities Canada trades. We are responsible for the safe and sustainable trade of them and movement of them."

In light of the above, I am requesting that you rethink your position.

It appears that U.S. coal companies are turning to Vancouver as an alternative to the controversies south of the border. Six new coal terminals proposed for Washington and Oregon are being contested. Seattle City Council has opposed coal train shipments across the state and through the city.

In my view, Port Metro Vancouver should broaden its public consultation process to include meetings where citizens can raise the issue of climate change and the role the port is playing in it by considering the export of thermal coal.

I request that the Board:

  1. delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals
  2. work to inform the broader public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals
  3. develop a straightforward transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals
  4. incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Yours sincerely

Lorna Medd

To the Port Metro Vancouver Board of Directors:

I am writing to express my concerns about the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals. I am research ecologist and father of a young daughter. As such, I know all too well that climate change is the biggest threat to the future of my daughter's generation, as well as to millions of people worldwide who already are suffering from extreme weather events and threats to food security . Given the state of climate science, and the well known fact that coal is the fossil fuel with the greatest potential for disrupting Earth's climate system, a decision by Port Metro Vancouver to approve new infrastructure to expand coal exports is ethically equivalent to willfully choosing to impact the ecosystems that sustain humanity and to greatly damage the future of my daughter's generation. Therefore, I appeal to our common humanity and the principles of our democratic society and ask you to do the following:

  1. Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.
  2. Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals. In particular, use published findings by climatologists on the climate impacts of coal (for instance: http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v2/n3/full/nclimate1421.html) as the objective basis for evaluating the ethical implications of expanding coal ports in Metro Vancouver.
  3. Inform the broad public throughout Metro Vancouver of the scale these proposals, emphasizing the climate impacts of coal.
  4. Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals. Let the public express their concern about the climate impacts of coal that would be promoted by the expansion of coal exports. If a public process makes clear that the climate impacts of coal exports are a broad concern, do not approve the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surry Dock coal export proposals.

Thank you for considering my concerns.

Alejandro Frid, Bowen Island, BC

Dear Port Metro Vancouver

Exporting more coal will destroy our kid's future. So please re-consider any plans for expanding coal export terminals in the greater Vancouver area.

Science facts tell us that we will destroy our climate if we burn most of the rest of the fossil fuel reserves on this planet. Specifically, Dr. Jim Hansen has written, along with many other eminent scientists and economists, that we must reduce our carbon emissions by 6% a year in order to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts. And finally, the International Energy Assc. - a group funded by governments, not environmentalists - has warned that all countries must reduce their carbon emissions drastically - this makes economic sense if you understand the potential impacts of climate change.

I request that you delay any decision on coal exports, allow open public hearings on this issue, and get a scientific review of the issues surrounding the breakdown of our climate due to the burning of fossil fuels.

Sincerely,

Harry Mensink, Duncan, BC

Coal. Black Plans.

To the Board of Directors

Sirs,

This must be a huge negative proposal when it comes to the cleanliness of our west coast and the atmosphere in general.

Why is this being done in secret? Why are the voters and local residences not being fully informed? This is an abhorrent proposal.

This may be a crucial decision, which once taken would be not easily revoked.

For the openness of the proposal, you must not move further until the public is aware of, and has had opportunity to comment on, these proposals. Your proposal must be clear and open. The effects on climate change of these proposals must be considered and offered in the consideration process.

Sure, maybe you consider that the port must enlarge. If this is indeed so, why must it be done at the detriment of farmland, local tourism, world climate, and shipping dangers of massively expanded tanker traffic?

Murray Little

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Hello

I am another concerned citizen who is very worried that exporting more coal will destroy our kid's future. Please re-consider any plans for expanding coal export terminals in the greater Vancouver area.

Science facts tell us that we will destroy our climate if we burn most of the rest of the fossil fuel reserves on this planet. Specifically, Dr. Jim Hansen has written, along with many other eminent scientists and economists, that we must reduce our carbon emissions by 6% a year in order to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts. And finally, the International Energy Assc. - a group funded by governments, not environmentalists - has warned that all countries must reduce their carbon emissions drastically - this makes economic sense if you understand the potential impacts of climate change.

I request that you delay any decision on coal exports, allow open public hearings on this issue, and get a scientific review of the issues surrounding the breakdown of our climate due to the burning of fossil fuels.

So please;

  1. delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals
  2. take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals
  3. develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals
  4. incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Ross Fugard, Mill Bay, BC

For the attention of the Board of Directors: no coal export expansion

Hello

I was shocked to learn there are plans to expand coal imports from our Port. In a warming world, this is simply not a sustainable action. I am even more surprised that no mention was made of these plans during the recent Port public consultation process.

Please do not approve these plans.

Elaine Golds

Proposed expansion of coal exports

To the Board of Directors, Port Metro Vancouver:

Regarding plans to significantly expand a coal port in Surrey (the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals):

Massive fossil fuels exports are already taking place through Vancouver. Proposals to expand Vancouver's export of dirty energy are simply wrong. We should instead be rapidly curtailing fossil fuel exports. We have entered an era in which the carbon impacts of all decisions must be addressed. Port Metro Vancouver is evidently acting as though this is not the case.

If Vancouver is to deserve a reputation as a green city, it cannot choose to be North America's primary exporter of atmospheric pollution.

Sincerely,

Tim Bartoo, Burnaby, B.C.

Concerned citizen Re:PMV expansion

To:

Board, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

Planing and Development Committee, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

Robin Sylvester, CEO Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

It has come to the public awareness that the Port Metro Vancouver is seeking to make our Port the largest exporter of coal in North America. The undemocratic nature in which these decisions are being made is a serious concern of mine and many others. The actions of the Port Authority affect not only ALL Canadians but the rest of the world given the irreversible effects of exporting the dirtiest fossil fuel on our GLOBAL environment, I am writing to ask that you, please:

  1. delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,
  2. take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,
  3. develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and
  4. incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

I thank you for your urgency and understanding of the severity of these concerns, and await your response.

Sincerely,

Lauren Kaljur, Vancouver, BC

Dear Port Metro Vancouver

Please do not allow massive coal exports through our local port. This decision is not yours to make. Local people ought to have input, and not just those living next to the railway. Millions of people are worried about climate change and the future of our grandchildren. Please make the process far reaching, fair, and respectful of public opinion. Climate change is the greatest threat to our environment since the nuclear threat of the 60's. Please think about the future of this planet and ot just profit for a few. The process should be far reaching, fair, and transparent.

Respectfully,

Tom Wheeler, Fanny Bay, BC

To whom it may concern:

We are very concerned to hear that the Fraser Surrey Dock is intending to expand its operations in order to start shipping vast quantities of coal to Asian markets.

This is absolutely unacceptable! This would make it the biggest coal port in North America. It would be contributing to the release of 106 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions a year!

This is highly irresponsible because it would be a huge contribution to climate change and the word can not afford this.

We urge you to :

  1. delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,
  2. make the effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,
  3. develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and
  4. incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Have a conscience and consider this proposals negative impact on future generations. Do not be swayed by quick money which will benefit just a few.

Yours sincerely,

Becky Williams-Freeman and
Kerry Williams-Freeman, Powell River, BC

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

To Whom It May Concern:

The purpose of this letter is to our express grave concern about the proposals currently being reviewed by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion.

These projects, should they be approved, will serve to make our port the largest coal exporter in North America. The burning of coal creates massive amounts of global warming pollution and with the approval of these projects our province would become a major contributor to climate change. The ramifications of climate change are clear, and gravely threaten our health and the health of the planet. How can our province, which promotes itself an exemplar of environmental responsibility be party to exacerbating the world's climate change when we are quickly approaching the tipping point of no return?

Of equal concern is the lack of a public review process for these proposals. Why have these projects, which have enormous implications for our climate, been subjected to little or no public scrutiny? The Port Authority's mandate is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." The Port Authority is certainly not acting with my support, nor in the best interests of my family, my community or my country.

We ask that you acknowledge the lack of public consultation or transparency in the application process. The public has not been adequately informed, nor has their input been invited.

To rectify this failure to meet your mandate, we ask that the Port Authority take the following steps:

  1. Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.
  2. Take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.
  3. Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.
  4. Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Respectfully yours,

M. Lynn Chartres

Owen Torode

Jessica Torode

Cass Torode

Madeira Park, BC

Dear Port Metro Vancouver,

I do not think it is fair that organizations that are in the business of making money from the export of coal get to make decisions that affect all of us, especially if those decisions are harmful. Just this week I read a report from the World Bank warning us of the disastrous financial consequences of climate change. The global community of climate change scientists are warning us that unless our carbon emissions are reduced by 6% a year we are likely to see the average world temperature increase to 4 degrees somewhere between 2060 and 2100. This will make our present increase in hurricanes storms and record breaking rains and heat seem like a tea party. Our provincial government liked to boast in our "green" province. Unfortunately the earth's atmosphere is seamless. Wherever coal is burned it affects all of us.

I would like to make the following requests:

1)delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals, 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for using common sense and taking courageous action,

Peter Spohn, Duncan,B.C.

Dear Port Metro Vancouver officials,

I have just learned of the applications and plans to hugely increase the shipment and export of coal from your port. I ask you not to proceed with this until you have heard from the citizens of British Columbia and Canada. Huge numbers of us are increasingly concerned with climate change which has already occurred and will continue to occur for years with no increased burning of fossil fuels. Coal is one of the worst and most polluting and climate-changing fossil fuels.

I ask you to inform the general public of BC and of Canada about the applications and propsals, and solicit the opinions and views of the general public before you proceed. I request that as well as encouraging the public to respond to these plans, you make their responses publicly available (easy to do electronically) so we can all see what the public opinion is.

I believe that opposition to the export of coal is so widely opposed that the public example set by Mar Jaccard earlier this year - physically and symbolically blocking a train carrying coal for export - will be taken up by more and more citizens, and that fairly quickly, unless the public opinion is heeded, these blockades will be less symbolic and more and more prevalent.

The small number of jobs that will come to your port, and to the communities in this corner of BC, are insignificant and ridiculous when compared to the damage and destruction that will happen with rising sea levels and increasing storm events brought about by climate change.

Get a grip, and stop this foolish plan.

Peter Johnston, semi-retired farmer, Lasqueti Island

Port of Metro Vancouver

November 26, 2012

To whom it may concern;

I am writing to express and document my indignation, outrage, and contempt at the irresponsible and reprehensible proposal that Vancouver's coal port be expanded in order to export more coal. Whether you have somehow missed the crux of the crisis we, as a species, are in before now, make careful note that we are plunging headlong into a present and future of disastrous consequences of monstrous proportions. Our present, Canadian levels of export of fossil fuels, and in particular coal, are shameful already given our knowledge of the implications it is already having for the extreme climatic areas of the earth: the North and South Poles and the Equatorial areas. We are only just beginning to understand the connections in a real way in the more moderate zones, like Southern Canada but we are hastening things home with our ongoing levels of exploitation and supply.

As as very minimum steps at this time it is imperative that you agree to delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) take efforts to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals, 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

I appreciate your speedy action on these matters, and anticipate your understanding as you become more informed of the science and the evidence indicating the immediacy and pressing nature of our situation and the urgent need for collective action. As Canadians, we should be leading the charge towards a sustainable world, rather than derailing processes designed to engender cooperation among parties, nations, and peoples, and the expansion of Vancouver's coal terminal alone would deliver the Knock-Out punch to the possibility of functioning within a framework of reducing global emissions.

It's past-time to change the way we live. As the father of five young children, I consider myself to have a five-fold responsibility to do the right thing to ensure their future success. Let's build for the future rather than destine our children to the unimaginable suffering that lies ahead if we continue with a culture of complacency, and business as usual.

Sincerely,

Rupert Koyote, Shawl Farm, Duncan

Dear Port Authority Directors

I am very concerned about the proposal to increase coal exports through the Port of Vancouver.

I wonder if you have fully considered this fact: If global CO2 emissions continue at current levels for another few decades, the resulting warming will cause sufficient warming to lead to a rise in sea level of several metres early in the next century, which would effectively destroy Vancouver's port facilities. It would seem short-sighted to approve the export of a product whose use will eventually destroy our sea-port.

Of course, global warming will be many other unfortunate effects as well, such as the loss of hundreds of million of human lives.

I urge you to delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals. Please inform the BC public of the exact nature and scale of these proposals, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.

It is essential that the Port Authority explicitly consider climate change impacts in the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you,

Doug Hopwood, Qualicum Beach

Dear Port Metro Vancouver

There is nothing positive about exporting more coal - except perhaps for some very short immediate monetary gain for a few corporations. On a global scale, everyone will suffer as people will not survive on this planet if we continue to pollute our air, water, food, etc. The future of our children and grandchildren is at stake. Please re-consider any plans for expanding coal export terminals in the greater Vancouver area.

Science facts tell us that we will destroy our climate if we burn most of the rest of the fossil fuel reserves on this planet. Specifically, Dr. Jim Hansen has written, along with many other eminent scientists and economists, that we must reduce our carbon emissions by 6% a year in order to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts. The International Energy Association - a group funded by governments, not environmentalists - has warned that all countries must reduce their carbon emissions drastically - this makes economic sense if you understand the potential impacts of climate change. Even the Wall Street Journal is now issuing dire warnings!

I request that you delay any decision on coal exports, allow open public hearings on this issue, and get a scientific review of the issues surrounding the breakdown of our climate due to the burning of fossil fuels. If the human race is to survive, we must do whatever we can to rethink our priorities and work together to provide alternative, sustainable forms of energy and way of leaving minimal footprints.

Please ask the board to

      delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,
        take effort to inform the broad BC public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,
          develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and
            incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

You may note that my location is Vancouver Island and not Vancouver. I write to you as I'm convinced that this is not just a lower mainland issue but an issue for all British Columbians and beyond. Through working together and in consideration for the health of the planet and all inhabitants, we can accomplish anything we put our minds to!

With the hope that wisdom will prevail,

Respectively

Lynn Burrows, Nanaimo

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

I am concerned about project proposals from two of your tenants. The tenants are the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades| Coal Handling Expansion.

These proposals are, apparently, currently under review by the Port Authority, although given the process to date the review is certainly not intended to be public. Given the nature of the Port Authority's mandate - "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians" - and the extreme danger represented by coal burning, the current review is, to say the least, a travesty.

Why a travesty? I will explain by first, briefly outlining what the projects propose to do, and second, the context and likely outcomes if the projects are allowed to proceed. I submit my explanation will make travesty seem a modest modifier.

As I understand them, the projects are to facilitate increasing the Port Authority's coal exports by as much as 14 million metric tonnes (Mt) per year. The Port Authority's coal export capacity will rise to as much as a shocking (another modest modifier given the context below) 59 million Mt/yr. The Port Authority would become the largest coal exporter in North America.

The most important issue here for a world on the brink of climate chaos is that burning this coal, wherever, by whomever, and for whatever purpose, will release more than 100 million Mt/yr of CO2 . This exceeds, greatly, all the rest of British Columbia's acknowledged greenhouse gas emissions combined.

That is the proposal, as I understand it. And, it is a proposal from hell, one that if it proceeds will drag all Canadians, including me, into the very bottom of a very deep moral gutter, and increase the likelihood of, perhaps guarantee, a world of social, economic, and environmental chaos.

Read more.

Dear Board of Directors,

I am dismayed that two large expansions of coal-shipping facilities are being considered by Port Metro Vancouver. I would encourage you to initiate a much broader public consultation around these issue, since I believe that most residents are unaware of the scope of the projects. I consider myself very interested and somewhat knowledgeable about energy projects in British Columbia, and this had escaped my notice until recently. I am also concerned that the expansion is contrary to the public interest.

Therefore, I would ask that any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals be delayed to allow for greater input, including from the public at large. This delay would be supported by your mandate, which requires you to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." I, for one, do not feel that you have either public support for the project, nor is it in the best interests of Canadian. As part of this process, I encourage you to develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, so that we ourselves can see the tone and direction of public comments.

Although I understand that your mandate doesn't directly require you to consider climate change impacts, I believe that as responsible corporate citizens committed to serving the best interests of Canadians, this issue must factor into your decision-making process. This expansion will enable the shipping of even more coal from North America, which is in no one's best interests when one takes a longer term view of human health.

I look forward to your response and to seeing appropriate action taken with respect to these requests.

Sincerely,

Gisela Ruckert

November 28th, 2012

I am writing to add my voice to those who have already expressed their concerns about two tenant-led project proposals currently under review by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades.

The World Bank recently commissioned a report which concluded that we must be doing everything we possibly can to drastically reduce the carbon we are spilling into our atmosphere in order to achieve a 50/50 chance of mitigating or avoiding the worst consequences of global warming.

If approved, these two projects will increase coal exports from the Port Authority by up to 14 million metric tonnes (Mt) per year. This will bring the Port Authority's coal export capacity up to a staggering 55 to 59 Mt per year, making it the largest coal exporter in North America. Converted into global warming emissions, this volume of exported coal will release, when burned, more than 100 Mt of CO2 emissions per year, a volume of global warming pollution much larger than all the emissions within BC each year, and more than that associated with oil exports from the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline.

As we are sure you know, the Northern Gateway pipeline proposal has been submitted to intense scrutiny through a broad public review process, and has received extensive media coverage. In contrast, the proposals now before the Port Authority have received little attention until quite recently, even though, when considered cumulatively, they have similarly significant implications for our climate and our future generations.

This is a problem that we call on you to correct.

The mandate of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority states that it is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." We write to you today to insist that these proposals are not in the best interests of Canadians. They will by their very nature hasten the onset of dangerous climate change, which poses a clear threat to our health and well-being. We also ask that you acknowledge that you cannot legitimately claim that these projects have broad public support, because you have not adequately informed the general public about their existence nor sufficiently invited the public to provide comment on their impacts.

To rectify this failure to meet your mandate, we ask that the Port Authority take the following steps:

      Delay any decision making on either project application;
        Inform the general public of Metro Vancouver of the scope of these projects, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and publicly tabulating their input;
          Incorporate explicit consideration of the global climate change impacts of project proposals into the decision making process for these and all future projects.

The International Energy Association, the World Meterological Association and the United Nations have all recently released warnings that we are not doing enough to reduce global warming emissions, and that the opportunity to avoid catastrophic runaway climate change is rapidly closing. Given all that is at stake, the Port Authority has an ethical obligation to pause and seriously reconsider these two coal export proposals and to re-evaluate its decision making processes.

We look forward to your response to these requests.

Thanks,

Tara Bonham

To: Board of Directors, Port Metro Vancouver

re: potential coal exports from Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks

I am concerned that climate change impacts appear not to have been factored into the proposed expansion of coal export facilities. Would it be possible to do this, and to inform the public ?

I look forward to your reply.

Thank you very much.

Blaise Salmon, Mill Bay

Please deliver my concerns to the Board of Directors

Please delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.

Please take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.

Please develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.

Please incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Best regards,

Brian Just

To Whom It May Concern;

I have grave reservations regarding the increased coal train traffic through White Rock, British Columbia. I have written no less than 5 times to nister of the Environment in Victoria asking if BNSF and any other coal train transporters will be put under the same safety guidelines in America where it is not uncommon to have coal trains capped. I have heard the argument the coal is sprayed with some kind of liquid that is supposed to prevent coal dust escaping, I cry bullshit. I see the coal dust everywhere in White Rock, on cars, retailers tell me they are constantly having to wipe down their merchandise.

STOP IT NOW, don't expand it. The impact on coal dust is well documented.

Dave Chesney, White Rock BC

Please Deliver My Concerns About Coal Export Expansion To The Board Of Directors

I wish to express my concerns on the proposed Neptune Terminals coal export expansion and the Fraser Dock proposal. Having, as a member of the BC Wildlife Federation been involved when Roberts Bank coal terminal was first Proposed and subsequently superimposed on one of the best rearing areas for waterfowl in the region I believe that any further expansion would be wrong, certainly without a full round of public consultation the goes beyond just the location of the proposal. Apart from the impacts on the environment including the loss of land from the Agricultural Land Reserve, I fail to understand why we would consider expanding coal exports at this time, when there is so much evidence that fossil fuels are contributing to climate change. This proposal needs to be subject to the strongest public scrutiny perhaps even through a public enquiry. And a further concern would be that the coal is destined for China where we would have no control how it would be burned. We have been told to think "Globally and act locally."

I ask that you develop a full, transparent process of public information and consultation before you make any pre-emptive decisions on the proposed development

That studies be undertaken to determine the Environmental and social impacts of the proposals.

Thank you!

Ed Mankelow Past President British Columbia Wildlife Federation

To Whom It May Concern,

I am deeply concerned by the Port Metro Vancouver Board of Directors in camera discussions regarding increasing coal shipments.

I believe the Board should 1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals, 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Sincerely,

Maureen Milledge

Coal Terminal at Fraser Surrey Docks

I am writing to express my concern about the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility.

The mandate of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority states that it is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." I do not believe this is in our best interest.

I am writing to insist that the proposal for a coal transfer facility at Fraser Surrey Docks should not go ahead.

You appear to have been quietly proceeding with this development without plans to open up the project for public review and comment.

As a resident of Delta I am totally opposed to this development. Delta already has many coal trains moving through our community and I do not wish to see these increase. Neither do I wish to see barges moving down the Fraser River carrying huge amounts of coal.

I am aware of the considerable opposition in Washington State to the expansion of coal shipments and the fact that Washington State appears to be going through a much more thorough review on the issue; so again unfair competition with American ports because "we Canada" will let them off at the cost of our environment and people.

To rectify this failure to meet your mandate, I now request that Port Metro Vancouver take the following steps:

      Delay any decision making on the project application;
        Inform the general public of Metro Vancouver of the scope of this project, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and publicly tabulating input;

I look forward to your response.

Roger Emsley

To the Port Authority,

I believe that the public should be formally consulted on the coal export plans currently under review by the Vancouver-Fraser Port Authority. Coal burning causes significant cardio-respiratory and other health problems, and that does not even include its effect on greenhouse gases. My belief is that Canada should be acting to decrease coal use, not to increase exports.

Yours sincerely,

Karen Shklanka, MD, Vancouver

Coal Export Expansion

I am concerned about the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion. the reason is my concern about the dnagerous effects of burning coal on the global climate. Please don't contribute to the burning of even more coal than is currently being burned.

Expanding the export of coal is not in the best interests of Canadians (not to mention the rest of the world).

Sincerely,

Catherine Russell, Vancouver BC

Plans for Exporting Coal

To all those involved in the process of deciding about exporting coal thus making our fair city one of the biggest exporter of coal in the Northern Hemisphere:

Please re-consider this whole idea.

We all have to stop and think where our actions are taking us. It's time to put our energies into green energy technology - not to perpetrate Victorian era energy consumption.

I call on you all to open this whole process to public scrutiny. Let the people have their voice. Let us decide.

Sincerely,

Alice Enns

I oppose the expansion of coal exports

Hello,

I am writing to express my opposition to the expansion of coal exports at the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority. I oppose this for two reasons:

1) Increased coal exports will lead to runaway global warming;

2) Increased coal dust will harm the local marine environment and damage human health.

I urge you to reconsider your plans, and to engage the public in your decision making.

Yours truly,

Jason McLaren

Do not wreck my Grandson's world with more coal

Dear Port authorities and planners

We are already seeing big changes from global warming. Our own Arctic sea ice is melting, as is Greenland. Record hot years follow one after the other.

The last thing the Earth needs is more coal! It would be the shame of Vancouver and Canada to go ahead with the two new proposed coal plants.

If we cannot acknowledge that public opinion is dead set against this polluting plan, I will join other peaceful protesters to do what I can to stop this project. My responsibility to my grandson demands it.

To start with, the 62 syndicated stations that carry my weekly program Radio Ecoshock will get an earful, all over the world, about the fact that Canada, and the Vancouver Port Authority don't care what we do to the atmosphere and future generations, so long as we look good now building big projects and making money for mining companies.

Shame on you, shame on us.

Alex Smith, Radio Ecoshock, Burnaby, BC

I do not support the transport of coal through BC

I do not support expanding the transportation of coal through BC and believe the public has a right to be consulted before such actions are approved.

Sincerely,

Leah Mino

Coal Port Expansion and Public Consultation

Sir/ Madam,

I am writing to express my dismay that the Port Authority feels public consultation on the expansion of the Coal Export capabilities of the Fraser Valley is not warranted.

I am very knowledgeable about climate change issues, and I hope that you recognize the immorality of Canada exporting coal to countries where there is not yet an avenue to ensure that fossil fuels can be used safely with minimal risk of catastrophic climate change. Clean coal is a myth, carbon capture and sequestration are neither in place commercially nor realistic. China is bringing on 80 new coal plants per year. I am sure you know this. The public does, too.

Canada takes a shuffling and mumbling approach to climate change, witness the recent abrogation of our Kyoto Protocol commitments. Why, because in the election cycle, jobs and dollars are really good sound bites.

When YOU make decisions that ignore these realities, our children will live in a world of war, famine, flood. It takes courage to say this is not the right decision. Why shouldn't we hold our reserves until a safe way can be found to use them? Why shouldn't carbon tax, FiT, or the export of sophisticated technology for these plants be an honorable prerequisite for our exports?

I urge you to be part of the solution to these dilemmas, and help Canada create a sustainable enrgy policy based on renewables. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Dr. Susan Diamond

Coal Exports

Dear Sir or Madam:

I am writing to express my total opposition to the plans to vastly expand coal exports from Metro Vancouver. Coal is a major contributor to greenhouse gases and the amount that would be exported from Metro Vancouver would release more carbon than all the oil flowing through the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline if it is approved.

I most certainly do not want to live in a city known as the largest coal exporter in North America, which is what Vancouver will become if these coal exports proceed.

This is just the wrong direction to take this wonderful place and against the green proclivities of the residents here.

I look forward to your prompt response informing me of what steps you will take to halt these exports.

Sincerely,

Roberta Olenick, Vancouver, BC

Coal Shipments

Hello,

I am a father of a young girl and I live across the tracks from the Port of Vancouver. We already deal with the diesel particulate from the trains that shunt 24/7 right outside our window. We deal with the train noise night and day and the port noise. I think that is enough pollution and noise for us. My job is maintaining 2 buildings on Railway st so we can't move. Please do not add the dirt and pollution that would be part of the shipping process from coal shipments. We are members of the community that are making this a vibrant part of Vancouver.

In this day and age, we must begin to think about the people that share this area, not just the profits of shipping coal. This is the dirtiest of fuels and we need to stop enabling the use of coal before it is too late to turn back global warming. You can be part of that solution. I'm sure there are a few of you that have children or grandchildren that this will affect. Isn't it time we thought about them in the process and not just ourselves or the profit to be gained.

I ask you as a parent with a child that will be directly affected by your actions and decisions on this matter. Please think long and hard before you take this decision and make the right choice.

Thank you for your time and consideration on this matter,

Brian Cyr, Heather Cyr, Sadie Cyr - 8 years old.

To the board of directors

I don't wish for this movement.

Thank you

Caliden Robinson

Coal Terminals for US Coal.

Dear Port executives,

Please do not accept coal from the USA for export from B.C. We don't need to be the enablers for this addiction to fossil fuels.

If the Americans wish to participate in the destruction of the atmosphere, the proliferation of manufacturing jobs going to China, and the selling of the Powder River basin coal for pennies per ton while they complain about the "fiscal cliff", let them soil their own ports with their coal. Why should we be part of that?

You cannot claim that discussion of environmental concerns about coal exports belongs "elsewhere" - if you are taking income from that export activity then the environmental crime is also on your hands. To save this planet we need drastic reductions in CO2 emissions IMMEDIATELY, and taking safely sequestered carbon (coal) from the ground and exporting it to be burned, is a giant step in the wrong direction.

PLEASE do not participate in this crime against the ecosystem which supports your life.

Robert McCroskey, Surrey

Please reconsider your plans to expand BC's coal handling facilities

Dear Sirs,

I would like to protest your plans to expand BC's coal handling facilities in the strongest possible terms. I am concerned that, if approved, Metro Vancouver would become the largest coal exporter in North America. Yearly, these exports would release more global warming pollution than all the oil flowing through the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline. This is completely unacceptable and, as a BC citizen, I call upon you to engage an open and transparent public dialog to discuss these proposals.

Joerg Messer

Voicing my opposition to coal export expansion

To:

Board, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

Planning and Development Department, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

Robin Sylvester, CEO Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

Though I was not a signatory to the open letter sent to you two days ago by a host of community leaders opposing the expansion of the coal export from Port Authority facilities, I am writing now to voice my opposition to this action.

This expansion has not had appropriate public consultation and is not in the best interest of Canadians. The role of coal in climate change is such that any further use of this fuel is taking us closer to dangerous climate change.

I support the demands outlined in the open letter that you:

1. Delay any decision making on either project application;

2. Inform the general public of Metro Vancouver of the scope of these projects, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and publicly tabulating their input;

3. Incorporate explicit consideration of the global climate change impacts of project proposals into the decision making process for these and all future projects.

Thank you for taking this input seriously. I look forward to your public response.

Sincerely,

Tara Ivanochko

No coal exports out of Vancouver

Please don't let this happen.

Damien Waugh

Head of Science, Fraser Academy

Concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

To Whom it may concern,

The news of the coal export expansion in my own backyard has just recently been brought to my attention. Among the many concerns I have with this one of which it literally being in my back door and blowing coal dust into my home on a daily basis and potentially causing me long term health issues, is the fact that the community was not informed of this decision.

I am quite unimpressed with this decision and I believe a delay of the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals should occur and more information should be shared with the community prior to finalizing the decision.

A straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals should be put in place to educate and inform the residents of not just Vancouver but BC as a whole on such important events occurring in our major cities and in some cases our backyards!

As a resident of Vancouver and a tax payer I feel the community should have been allowed to participate in and be educated on the impacts this may have to the community both good and bad. This is a decision that could potentially effect myself and others locally as well as having long reaching negative environmental impacts within BC and as such should be addressed on a community platform.

I hope that proper attention is given to this and that the voice of our community is allowed to be heard and not overlooked.

Concerned and not properly informed resident of :

Vancouver, BC

Michelle Beaudry

Coal Exports

I disagree with the expansion of coal exportation through Vancouver. Particularly the noise and presence of these ships is harmful to marine life.

Brenda Mattman

Coal

To the Port Authority:

I'm writing to ask if you will take urgent action to help stop two coal export plans currently under consideration. If approved, Metro Vancouver would become the largest coal exporter in North America. Yearly, these exports would release more global warming pollution than all the oil flowing through the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline. Given the urgent need to reduce emissions to avoid runaway climate change, these reckless plans cannot move forward. (Given the risks that toxic coal dust presents to our health, to farm land and to marine life, these plans should be stopped even without considering the threat they present to our climate.)

Please stop this export.

Sincerely,

Cindy Lee

Your Ref: Coal Exports and Carbon Emissions.

Port Metro Vancouver

Dear Board of Directors,

As a concerned citizen of the Lower MainLand, I am contacting you to ask that you delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals to allow for a proper appraisal of coal exports considering the Carbon emissions involved.

Please take the effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals considering the global impact of GHG emissions and the future impacts of global warming, climate change and ocean acidification.

Please put in place a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

My concern for carbon GHG emissions is pressing as I have three kids and I do not like what a warming world will mean for their future.

The past couple of years have given us a clear picture what is in store as we move forward. Just look at New Jersey and New York! What happens there in a few years time when they are again hit by an amped up climate? What about our BC forests, devastated by Pine Beetles, amped up on warm winters? The effects on our economy is plain to see.

We all have a responsibility here for the safety and health of our kids, who need a sustaining and vibrant environment to live in.

Please take the threat of man made carbon emissions seriously. Economic prosperity can not come at the cost of a dead end future for our kids and communities.

Best regards,

Paul Magnus, Richmond

A citizen writing to oppose 2 new coal exportation projects

To Whom It May Concern,

Please do not proceed with plans to proceed with 2 new coal exportation through the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority without first engaging the public and arranging for in-depth expert assessment of risks .

Sincerely,

Julie Martz, MD

Inadequate public process is abusive and enabling increased coal shipments is ecocide

1. You have not allowed the citizens of British Columbia and Canada to have adequate participation in the development of your plans to expand port facilities. This is an abuse of power in a democracy in which citizens who may be severely affected by the decisions of unelected Port officials have virtually no way to know the details of those decisions and to influence them.

2. The Port's short-sighted and capricious plans to increase its capacity to export coal may qualify in the near future as an act of ecocide. Just as genocide is now a criminal offence (It became illegal after World War II), the enabling of ecocide by Port staff may put those responsible for such a course of action at risk of prosecution under international trusteeship law. For your own sake and for the sake of the grandchildren of the world, please halt the Port's plans for expansion.

I am someone who knows how to process scientific information (I have a BS in Biology, an MD, a Master of Science in Epidemiology (Harvard), and a Doctor of Science in Hygiene (Johns Hopkins). I can assure you that expansion of the port's coal exporting capacities would be a direct threat to life as we know it on this planet. For the Port to embark on such expansion without an environmental assessment that includes the impact of increased coal exports on climate and ecosystems would be malpractice in regard to the protection of the public interest.

I look forward to your considered response to this statement.

Frederic Bass, MD, S M Hyg, Dr Sci Hyg

Re: Coal Exports

To Whom It May Concern:

I'd like to remind you of part of your mandate: "to operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians". This should include public consultation on a matter of this impact. This decision benefits the very few, while ultimately bringing environmental and health consequences to the many.

Pat Caraher

A Concerned Vancouver Resident

Expansion of coal exports

I am writing to add my name to the growing list of people who are asking for the decision about the expansion of the our coal exporting facilities in North Vancouver and Surrey to be delayed until there is opportunity for a full public consultation. The Fraser Port Authority has a mandate to work in the broad interest of all Canadians, and this proposal needs to be publicly scrutinized with this in mind. The environmental impact on the planet will be substantial, permanent, and negative, and that needs to be balanced with any economic advantage that will be realized.

There needs to be a transparent, honest and open discussion about the impacts of these projects, not just on British Columbia, or the Lower Mainland region, but on the planet as a whole.

Please delay any decision until this discussion can take place.

Respectfully Submitted,

Dianne Henshaw

Vancouver BC

Coal in Metro Vancouver

To the Vancouver Port Authority,

Please do not proceed with the proposed plans to export coal. Canada used to be viewed as a leader in environmental issues - and now with the tar sands and pipelines we're a laggard. If you proceed with the proposed coal exports, you will make Metro Vancouver the largest coal exporter in North America and move us further away from our goal of being the greenest city - to being one of the dirtiest cities.

Aside from derailing the "greenest city" goal, these plans will make Metro Vancouver a dangerous city to live in - as coal dust is toxic to humans, marine life and our farm lands.

Please do the right thing. We, as a combined city, don't need the funds that badly. Doing the right thing is more important than making money by doing the wrong thing.

Thank you,

Dawn

Vancouver

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Coal = old, messy and lethal to the planet.

No more shipping this material in the Straight.

No more shipping it anywhere! This reliance on carbon-heavy fuels is stone-age.

Let's get it together people.

Alex

No Coal in Coal Harbour

As a long time resident, I oppose any plan to bring coal and the ensuing health and environmental concerns to the coal harbour area. Further, I will support all efforts in opposition to this idea.

Craig Minielly

Hazardous coal transportation!

To whom it may concern,

I am writing you because I am very concerned about the public's and the environmental wellfare if you approve the proposed coal transportations! Coal dust is toxic and therefore I demand public input into this issue. You cannot make decicions that risk our well being and that of the environment without even consulting with us! That is not how democracy works. We have rights!

Sincerely,

Marlis Klucker

Increased Coal Exports From Vancouver Fraser Port

Hello,

I have been made aware that you are considering permitting dramatically increased coal exports from the Vancouver Fraser port facilities. As a Canadian and British Columbian who is deeply concerned about the impacts of coal burning on global climate change, I am disturbed about this revelation.

As a Canadian, I feel that it is your duty to allow me and my countrymen the opportunity of an extensive and open public process before you take this step, which has serious and real implications for all of our futures. Please do not make this decision without proper consultation.

Thank you for your attention to my concerns. I trust that you will provide an expeditious response to this note.

George Smith, Gibsons

cc Nicholas Simons, MLA,, Powell River/Sunshine Coast
John Horgan, MLA, NDP Critic for Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources

Coal Exports

We do not want any more coal exporting going on in the Metro Vancouver Area and I am against the development of more coal shipping. Climate impacts on coal experts definitely does not "belong elsewhere". Please cease plans for this development.

Sincerely Susan DeBeck

Coal exports from the port of metro vancouver

It's crazy to think that our region would become the largest conduit in North America for providing coal to the world to help exacerbate climate change. The climate can't handle anymore coal combustion. The decisions made by the Port Authority will reflect deeply on the steps our region is willing to take to avoid the biggest challenge facing the world today. To me, exporting coal is almost as ludicrous as exporting supplies to Nazi concentration camps. Given the extremely slow global response to climate change mitigation, we know that billions of people around the world, the poorest being the most vulnerable, will face increased hardship from drought, heat waves, storms, sea level rise, etc. Even in tough economic times, the extra jobs from exporting coal aren't worth it - and I'm a recent university graduate who knows a bit about the challenges in finding a job in today's job market. Don't allow us to be know for being implicit on catalyzing climate change.

Regards,

Blane Grann, Vancouver

Coal traffic through the Vancouver port

I would like to ask that an open and thorough safety and environmental review be carried out before the Port Authority approves any expansion to the port's coal handling. The natural disasters over the past few years are a clear warning to proceed with utmost caution when expanding traditional industries or implementing innovations. These natural disasters have become terrible human disasters because of criminal negligence on the part of those authorities who claim to work in the public interest. If you proceed through a transparent, public assessment you would not only reassure the public and gain a better understanding of the implications of the expansion, but you would by the same assessment protect the Authority from any suspicion of negligence in the case of a natural disaster.

I hope you understand that incremental increases in technological infrastructure can lead to unpredictable results. I hope you are aware that:

We are in an earthquake zone where earthquake preparedness is a priority.
Fires inevitably follow natural disasters, such as we recently saw during hurricane Sandy.
Safety regulations and public scrutiny were ignored in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.
Generations of suffering have and will be caused by the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the Chernobyl disaster, Valdes oil spill, and the BP Horizon well disaster.

And I hope you are keenly aware that there are hundreds of thousands of men, women and children living within a few kilometers of the port, and that Vancouver's population of 2 million would be affected by any fire, explosion or natural disaster that affects the port.

Without an open, thorough and scientific --medical, seismological, climatological -- assessment, the people of Vancouver can only fear that their safety is being sold to the highest bidder, as was done in the BP DeepWater disaster and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Safety concerns would dictate that the transportation of oil, coal and other hazardous materials should be scaled back, not scaled up in densely populated areas like Vancouver.

Yours,

Bill Winder, Vancouver

To the Board of Directors:

To Port Metro Vancouver,

Vancouver Fraser Port Authority has no right to make environmental decisions that will have a detrimental effect on the rest of BC. How dare your organization support the resource corporations over the communities that want sustainable and environmental solutions to the increasingly heavy handed decisions coming from big business. The wild salmon of the Fraser River must be protected above all other considerations. Already their habitat is severely compromised by development. A majority of citizens want these icon fish preserved and your expansion of the Port Authority will impact negatively on the vital marine environment of the Fraser Delta.

How can you ruin the environmental record of Vancouver as a Green City by this preposterous plan to make the city into the biggest exporter of coal in North America? It is deeply shameful that the Port advertizes its greed in catering to this sinful industry right in plain sight of all the ferry boats at Tsawwassen. School children are taught that BC's coal exports are a major contributor of global warming yet you continue to act as though there are no consequences.

The unelected and unaccountable Port Authority has no right to act behind closed doors. The public must be consulted. Listen to the world's leading climate scientists and advocates who have called on the Port Authority to delay any decision on coal export expansion, to bring the public into broad consultation on these proposals, and to explicitly consider climate impacts in all their future decisions.

Sincerely,

Dr. Karen Wonders, Victoria

To the Board of Directors:

We are writing to ask the Port Authority to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation and explicit consideration given to climate impacts.

Climate change is everyone's business. We should all be working as a team to address the warnings given by climate change scientists around the world that continued expansion of fossil fuel use may be catastrophically harmful to our way of life in the near future. The short-term financial gains for expanded trade in these commodities may be tempting but the short-term and longer-term price to pay may be disastrous.

Please do the right thing: listen to the scientists and switch the investment to alternative energies while we've still got a fighting chance.

Thanks for taking action.

Mike and Selinda White, Denman Island

please don't expand coal...

Hi there -- We all have to take responsibility for our actions, and facilitating the continued and increasing burning of coal is unnacceptable. I don't believe that burning or shipping coal is in the best interests of Canadians. Please don't do it.

Max Thaysen

To the Board of Directors:

Dear sirs,

Perhaps you have not yet read the new, very mainstream report on climate change by the World Bank.

To ad to the collapse of entire eco-systems and future displacement of humans in the name of trade is unconscionable. To export particularly to the Chinese, who want to buy out North America and have zero emissions standards is even worse.

We need public consultation please.

Nora Davidson and family of 5

plans for coal expansion

To Whom It May Concern:

This concerns all of us - locally, and of course beyond our borders.

By writing, I hope you will consider engaging in a transparent public discussion about the Port Authority's expansion plans for coal exportation.

Delaying the expansion would mean that the public could be thoroughly consulted on these proposals, and that any future decision explicitly consider the climate implications of these exports. In addition, public involvement is paramount given the risks that coal dust presents to our health, to farm land and to marine life.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Bibiana Tomasic, New Westminster

To the Board of Directors:

Dear Fellow Citizens,

I am deeply concerned that in these times of accelerating climate change there are efforts afoot to increase coal use and export in and from Vancouver. The major emitter of GHGs has been found to be coal - it is even worse than Athabasca bitumen.

Currently discussions are being held in Doha to reduce atmospheric carbon. Scientists are finding that we may have entered an era of positive feedback effects which will accelerate the present level of ~0.7C. We are also told that it is imperative that the world stays below 2C, which was agreed to in Copenhagen way back in 2009. In light of all these critical issues facing us in the near future we must make sustained efforts to de-carbonize our societies.

For these reasons I am requesting that the Vancouver Port Authority delay any further decisions on the proposed Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation.

In a functioning democracy it is imperative that people be heard, indeed the definition that all new immigrants learn is that, "Democracy is government by the people and for the people". I know this because I emigrated here from Britain some 36 years ago.

In conclusion I would urge you to reconsider what the future holds for us and it is one of two choices: We can continue to burn combustibles that were deposited beneath the earth hundreds of millions of years ago and suffer the dire consequences (which have been particularly profound during the last year of 2012 and will only get worse). Alternatively we can act on the advice of MIT trained scientist, Thomas Homer-Dixon (who spoke in Edmonton just last week), and recognize that the world will, in the next few years, be forced to severely reduce our carbon burning.

The investments made today will be lost for various reasons, not the least a collective recognition that, "we will act in the next 5 years on climate change". Investors who assume that governments will continue to ignore worldwide concern will suffer financial loss. Coal requires oil to be shipped, and this comodity is peaking at the present moment: only small deposits at very high cost are being found. For the good of people, the planet and our fiscal wellbeing, continued fossil extraction and export is a dead end (the word "dead" is appropriate).

Yours very Sincerely,

David J. Parker. Peng, Edmonton

Re: To the Board of Directors:

I support the open letter sent November 27, 2012 from the world's leading climate scientists and advocates calling on the Port Authority to delay any decision on coal export expansion, to bring the public into broad consultation on these proposals, and to explicitly consider climate impacts in all their future decisions.

Please reconsider for the sake of your children.

Jackie MacDonald, Victoria

Coal export

Dear Port Authority,

I am concerned about two tenant-led project proposals under review by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion.

If approved coal exports will increase up to 14 million metric tonnes per year, making the Port Authority the largest coal exporter in North America. This is not in the best interest of the public or the environment. Please be transparent and consult with the public about this project.

Sincerely,

A very concerned Lower Mainland resident,

Lyda Salatian, Surrey

Dear Board of Directors,

I am writing to express my grave concerns about the proposal to expand coal exports from BC at this time when we are feeling the effects of burning fossil fuels. There is a causal link between fossil fuel use and increasing severity of storms, extreme weather, weather pattern changes, and the oceans rising.

We can stop this if we stop burning fossil fuels! Wake up!

We need to invest in non carbon emitting fuels. Expanding coal use moves us all toward more climate change, more CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and in the opposite direction we should be going right now.

It is sheer lunacy to expand coal production and export!!

I would like to ask the Port Authority to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation.

Very sincerely,

Prudence L Moore

Deep concerns about coal transport and shipping

Dear Decision Makers:

I urge you to delay any decision-making regarding the expansion of the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks for the shipment of coal. I ask this because I'm only just now hearing about these projects and it's my understanding that there has not been full public knowledge and input on these proposals. It was also my understanding that your mission is to act on behalf of all British Columbians, and to that end, I urge you to have complete and un-prejudiced public consultation on these proposals.

Communities all along the train tracks have the right to weigh in on these proposals, for they will be adversely impacted by the dirty emissions of coal dust from the huge increase in the transport of coal. Anyone with an even mildly compromised immune system or respiratory ailments will be at risk from coal dust. We're talking the elderly and children! Every single one of us on planet Earth will be adversely impacted by the climate-changing carbon emissions that will result from burning this coal wherever it ends up.

Public health is my primary concern, but also the risk to the environment of coal dust emissions and the impact of inevitable train derailments and spillage of coal along the route.

Furthermore, I want to see full environmental impact studies done before any decision is made to expand port facilities for the export of dirty coal. It seems nonsensical to invest in additional long-term infrastructure for a dirty energy source that is destined to be phased out as cleaner energy sources come online. Why would we risk our health and environment to become the biggest coal exporting country in North America? Fossil fuels are non-renewal, finite, and their extraction, transport, and shipment overseas are all part of an industry in its death throes. Besides, short-term profit won't buy us clean lungs and a clean environment.

Personally, my wish for British Columbia is that we do everything within our power to protect clean air and water and beautiful natural places. These attributes can generate ongoing millions in tourist and recreational dollars-- more than would be generated from increased coal exports. People will flock to our province to see the natural beauty that we've protected-- but not if we've contaminated the Lower Mainland with coal dust through expanded coal transport and shipment.

I look forward to hearing back from you about the concerns laid out above,

Sincerely,

Jamie K. Donaldson, Kitsilano

To the Board of Directors:

I am so against these carbon exporting ventures. Canada needs a new direction with out contributing the needless burning of fossil fuels. Profit over common sense makes no sense. Please, please, please change needs to take place and it can start right here! Say no to coal exporting!

I ask the Port Authority to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation. You need to be accountable to your due diligence!

Jim Herbert

To the Board of Directors:

We don't need to export more fossil fuel that will add to Global Warming.

I would request that the Port Authority to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation.

Michael D. Smith, Oakville

Dear Board of Directors,

I urge you to prevent any expansion of the Fraser River and Neptune Terminals. Indeed I urge you to develop a plan for a closing down the terminals. We know that we are headed for a 4 degree increase in global temperatures and continuing to increase the burning of coal will condemn our future generations to a planet unlivable for humans. Future generations will look upon your actions as crimes against humanity. I urge you to exercise leadership for future generations and not expand these terminals.

Sincerely,

Bill Darnell

To the Board of Directors:

If we don't act immediately and take draconian action, we humans could be extinct by 2060. This is not a joke.

Please read: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcc.81/full
"Drought Under Global Warming: a Review" by Aiguo Dai
http://www.atmos.albany.edu/facstaff/adai/

See the maps of drought in the 2060s on page 15.

http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2011/10/the-moscow-warming-hole/
http://thinkprogress.org/romm/2011/10/26/353997/nature-dust-bowlification-food-insecurity
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2011/10/18/1101766108.abstract
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/2011/03/16/science.1201224
http://www.fas.org/irp/agency/dod/jason/statistics.pdf

http://climateprogress.org/2010/10/20/ncar-daidrought-under-global-warming-a-review/
http://climateprogress.org/2010/12/14/southwest-drought-global-warmin/
http://climateprogress.org/2011/01/20/lester-brown-extreme-weather-climate-change-record-food-prices/

"Preliminary Analysis of a Global Drought Time Series" by Barton Paul Levenson, not yet published. Under BAU [Business As Usual], agriculture and civilization will collapse some time between 2050 and 2055 due to drought caused by GW [Global Warming].

See:

"Ecological Footprints and Bio-Capacity: Essential Elements in Sustainability Assessment" by William E. Rees, PhD, University of British Columbia and "Living Planet Report 2008" also by Rees.

We went past the Earth's permanent carrying capacity for humans some time in the 1980s. We are 20%+ over our limit already. And the US no longer has excess biocapacity. We are feeding on imports. 4 Billion people will die because we are 2 Billion over the carrying capacity. An overshoot must be followed by an undershoot.

Reference: "The Long Summer" by Brian Fagan and "Collapse" by Jared Diamond. When agriculture collapses, civilization collapses. Fagan and Diamond told the stories of something like 2 dozen previous very small civilizations. Most of the collapses were caused by fraction of a degree climate changes. In some cases, all of that group died. On the average, 1 out of 10,000 survived. We humans could go EXTINCT in the 2050s. The 1 out of 10,000 survived because he wandered in the direction of food. If the collapse is global, there is no right direction.

1. We must take extreme action now. Cut CO2 production 40% by the end of 2015. [How to do this: Replace all coal fired power plants with factory built nuclear. Renewables do not work except for niche markets.] Continuing to make CO2 is the greatest imaginable GENOCIDE. We have to act NOW. Acting in 2049 will not work. Nature just doesn't work that way. All fossil fuel fired power plants must be shut down and replaced with nuclear. Target date: 2015.

2. Expect at least 4 Billion people to die because of the population overshoot. Attempt to maintain some form of civilization while this happens.

How are we feeding 7 billion now? On "mined" water. Aquifers are running dry. When the aquifers are dry, the food is gone.

Edward Greisch

To the Board of Directors:

I am writing to express my extreme disappointment that you are considering opening up BC as a carbon corridor by exporting coal through the Metro Vancouver Port. What you are doing is a crime. You are selling the future of our children. All over the US coast, people are fighting coal ports, so now they have come to you and you fling open the door. This is wrong on so many levels. What happens is a few mining companies and the port makes money, but ultimately it is mankind who pays for it. Often the poorest people are the ones who suffer most. Ultimately, it will be the taxpayers who pay for the damage done by climate change. Please, do not do this to future generations. We need to transition to greener energy and a post carbon world. By not opening up Vancouver to coal exports, you will be moving towards a more sustainable future for this planet. It is not just your choice.

Lynne Wheeler, Fanny Bay

Opposition to Coal Exports from Port Metro Vancouver

I write to express my opposition to the export of coal from Port Metro Vancouver. I am opposed, in fact, to the export of coal from any port, indeed to the mining and burning of coal (except under very strict conditions).

Climate change is a very serious problem, and burning coal without capturing the CO2 , anywhere in the world, is a serious problem too. While I would not take a position that no coal ought to be burned anywhere in the world, starting immediately; I am strongly opposed to simply shrugging our shoulders and acting as though, by enabling the export of North American coal to countries across the Pacific where coal is being burned without any carbon sequestration, we have no responsibility for the consequences of the incremental emissions.

By refusing, as the citizens of Bellingham, WA have done, to enable the export of coal to Asia, we can at least help force an intelligent dialogue on the subject, and we should. Canada as a country, is already badly tarred globally, by our short-sightedness in seeking rapid exploitation of the Alberta tar sands. To compound this with becoming an enabler of coal exports, is unconscionable.

My professional training is in economics and accounting (BA (Honours) in economics (1977), MBA (1982) and CGA designation (1985)) , and I have 30-odd years of private sector business experience, so I can`t easily be typecast as economically naive. I believe our future prosperity depends critically on emphasizing major investments in human capital, and figuring out how to make a major step forward in resource productivity in particular, and building an economy based on advanced technology and high rates of added-value. Skewing our economy any further towards resource extraction and export of un-beneficiated or only modestly-beneficiated natural resources, will be economically disastrous, if not immediately, certainly in fairly short order. The Canadian economy is skewed enough already.

Accordingly, I do not want to see Port Metro Vancouver becoming a major hub for the export of North American coal.

Yours sincerely

Michael Barkusky, Vancouver

Stop Expanding Coal Exports

Hello,

I'm writing to ask you to stop all progress in coal export plans currently under consideration by the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority.

As the Port Authority's mandate is "to operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians", I, as a Vancouver resident, and a mother of three young children, cannot see in this expansive and toxic pollution, anything that fits the bill of "best interests of Canadians."

You have the responsibility to DO THE RIGHT THING, before it is too late.

Gili Avrahami, Vancouver

To the Board of Directors:

Dear Sirs;

Two proposals currently before the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, and if approved, would make Metro Vancouver the biggest exporter of coal in North America. In total, the region's coal exports would produce more global warming pollution each year than the oil in the Northern Gateway Pipeline. Given the urgent need to cut emissions to avoid a runaway climate disaster, these plans can only be described as madness.

As a citizen of the only planet we have, I am asking the Port Authority to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation.

Thank you for your time and your consideration.

David Martin, Ph.D., Norwich, CT

Dear Board Members;

We are writing today to express our concerns about two tenant-led project proposals currently under review by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion.

If approved, these two projects will increase coal exports from the Port Authority by up to 14 million metric tonnes (Mt) per year. This will bring the Port Authority's coal export capacity up to a staggering 55 to 59 Mt per year, making it the largest coal exporter in North America. Converted into global warming emissions, this volume of exported coal will release, when burned, more than 100 Mt of CO2 emissions per year, a volume of global warming pollution much larger than all the emissions within BC each year, and more than that associated with oil exports from the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline.

As we are sure you know, the Northern Gateway pipeline proposal has been submitted to intense scrutiny through a broad public review process, and has received extensive media coverage. In contrast, the proposals now before the Port Authority have received little attention until quite recently, even though, when considered cumulatively, they have similarly significant implications for our climate and our future generations.

This is a problem that we call on you to correct.

The mandate of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority states that it is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." We write to you today to insist that these proposals are not in the best interests of Canadians. They will by their very nature hasten the onset of dangerous climate change, which poses a clear threat to our health and well-being. We also ask that you acknowledge that you cannot legitimately claim that these projects have broad public support, because you have not adequately informed the general public about their existence nor sufficiently invited the public to provide comment on their impacts.

To rectify this failure to meet your mandate, we ask that the Port Authority take the following steps:

1. Delay any decision making on either project application;

2. Inform the general public of Metro Vancouver of the scope of these projects, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and publicly tabulating their input;

3. Incorporate explicit consideration of the global climate change impacts of project proposals into the decision making process for these and all future projects.

The International Energy Association, the World Meterological Association and the United Nations have all recently released warnings that we are not doing enough to reduce global warming emissions, and that the opportunity to avoid catastrophic runaway climate change is rapidly closing. Given all that is at stake, the Port Authority has an ethical obligation to pause and seriously reconsider these two coal export proposals and to re-evaluate its decision making processes.

We look forward to your response to these requests.

Melinda Auerbach

President, Lasqueti Island Nature Conservancy

Coal Export Plans and the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

To Whom It Concerns:

Please stop ramming through plans to make Vancouver the largest coal exporter in North America.

Coal dust is highly toxic and will affect our health, our food, and our sea life for generations to come.

As a democracy there needs to be public consultation before any decision about this serious issue is reached.

With hopes for your understanding,

Renee Rodin, Vancouver

Dear Sirs & Madams:

I am extremely concerned about plans to expand coal export facilities in the lower mainland area.

I ask that you delay any decision on the Neptune Terminal and Surrey Fraser Docks until there is broad and comprehensive public consultation.

Surely, in a time when the global impacts of the use of fossil fuels are seen to be dire, the prospect of this area becoming the largest exporter of coal in North America requires your full due diligence in the public interest.

Thank you for considering my views.

P. Willis

To the Board of Directors

Two proposals currently before the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, if approved, would make Metro Vancouver the biggest exporter of coal in North America. In total, the region's coal exports would produce more global warming pollution each year than the oil in the Northern Gateway Pipeline. Given the urgent need to cut emissions to avoid a runaway climate disaster, these plans can only be described as madness.

Who gets to decide on an issue with such big implications for our future? Right now, a handful of staff at the Port Authority, behind closed doors. They've already said that they don't expect to engage the public further on these decisions - an outrageous statement given that, outside of letters to nearby neighbours, they haven't yet consulted the general public at all. It's clear that only a sustained public outcry is going to get through to the unelected and (so far) unaccountable Port Authority.

Arthur Soles, Artztudio, Chemainus

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

I would ask the board to 1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals, 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Please delay any decision regarding coal export proposals.

Thank you,

Ray C. Haynes

To the Board of Directors

Sir/Madam:

I have become aware of plans to expand your coal export capacity.

I am really concerned that our continued export of BC and US coal pretty much defeats efforts to reduce green house gas emmisions in our 2 jurisdictions. I sincerely believe we must make a serious committed effort to reduce greenhouse emissions around the world.

Please delay a decision on coal export proposals until you have widespread public discussions. Listening to corporate interests is not adequate.

Sincerely

David Kidd PhD, Lake Cowichan

To: Port of Vancouver

Today please take action to hold public consultations regarding increasing coal exports from the Port of Vancouver.

So far it seems that no public consultations have taken place. Since this decision affects the general public in terms of the environment and sustainable climate and fish stocks, it is the correct process to be using at this time.

Thank you for you consideration,

Mary Hudson, Vancouver Island

Dear Metro Vancouver Port Authority Board of Directors,

The two proposals in front of you regarding the export of coal at the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks are extremely significant ones with huge impact to our communities, province and world. They are decisions that cannot and should not be made without a full and broad public consultation process.

The approval of these two proposals would make Metro Vancouver the biggest exporter of coal in North America. In total, the region's coal exports would produce more global warming pollution each year than the oil in the Northern Gateway Pipeline, and the transport of coal would expose our communities, waterways and farmlands to toxic coal dust. The decision as to whether to proceed with the transport of coal is not just an immediate economic one. There are long term social, environmental and economic issues at stake here and we need to consider them all, in order to make the best decision possible for the good of all.

As wisely said by the great Canadian scientist, David Suzuki:

There are some things in the world we can't change - gravity, entropy, the speed of light, and our biological nature that requires clean air, clean water, clean soil, clean energy and biodiversity for our health and well being. Protecting the biosphere should be our highest priority or else we sicken and die. Other things, like capitalism, free enterprise, the economy, currency, the market, are not forces of nature, we invented them. They are not immutable and we change them. It makes no sense to elevate economics above the biosphere.

The magnitute of the decisions before you cannot be understated and there is not only one way forward. There may be better and wiser ways that are not immediately obvious, ones that balance social and environmental needs with economic ones. A win-win option. Please delay making any decision until you have held a full public consultative process. Let's talk, let's listen to each other, and let's find the best solution for us all.

Kind regards,

Jelena Putnik, Vancouver

To Port of Vancouver

As a citizen concerned about climate change and the deleterious effect of fossil fuel burning on our planet, I strenuously oppose expansion of coal exports from BC ports. In addition to the severe health risks posed to local citizens by transporting coal within our province, BC will be encouraging the burning of this toxic substance overseas hastening climate change and the ultimate demise of our planet. The world's future should not be jeopardized by the Port's profit-based and in camera decision process. Please heed the experts and demonstrate global stewardship by stopping all expansion plans now. Our planet's tenuous future depends on each of us making tough and far-reaching decisions today. Please forego early profit for sustainable life.

Sincerely,

KM Baker, Vancouver

Please deliver my concerns to the board of directors

Please delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.

Make sure to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.

Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.

Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thanks,

- Greg

no to the increase in coal export

I resent that a small group of people at the Port Authority decide behind close doors to increase a carbon footprint that we should be working on diminishing not increasing. A decision with such big implications for our future must be decided after audits that involve the whole stakeholders...including environmentalists.

Yvon Raoul

To the Board of Directors:

Even though I am a US citizen, I am also a citizen of the world and it is my moral obligation to express my concern about mining and shipping coal. All of us, including your families and loved ones, are facing a climate catastrophe due to our reliance on fossil fuels.

We must stop using these sources of energy and while we are all complicit in their use, you have the ability to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation.

Think about the science - the realities of the dire situation we are facing and make the right decision.

You are perpetuating crimes against humanity - and indeed, all life on this planet.

Margaret Welke, Madison, WI

To the Board of Directors:

Read Chris Hedges and take heed. Fossil fuel burning is going to raise the planet's temperature by 4 degrees. I will make this short so you WILL read it. Go to http://www.commondreams.org/views/2012/11/26-0

signed by a very very very alarmed citizen of Canada. David

RE: Coal and Vancouver area Ports

Hello -

Please vote down the proposed massive expansion of coal export from Vancouver-area ports. Coal is not a sustainable energy source, and with the current global warming crisis, proceeding with these massive, and environmentally destructive, increases in coal export makes no sense. Short term profit, in exchange for long term negative impacts, is not a fair trade.

Rudi Leibik

voter/concerned citizen

To whom it may concern:

Regarding the expansions of any ports to ship more coal, filthy tar, oil or anything that is dangerous to our environment, wildlife, seafood, climate change and public enjoyment of our waters I request most seriously that the Port Authority delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation. As these decisions affect so many issues and so many people not only in the direct vicinity but all along our coast and eventually around the world it is imperative that all negative aspects are considered, measured and recognised.

It is NOT always about money which is really just greed which seems to have no consideration for our world, the environment, our precious wildlife, food sources or Canadian citizens. This has to change and you have the capacity to make a difference to make a stand and stand out in the world stating that promoting green sustainable industries is more important. WITHOUT A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT THERE IS NO ECONOMY OR LIFE!!!!

Thanks for taking action!

Marilyn McClelland, Fanny Bay

Dear Board of Directors of the Port Authority

Your intentions to expand the Neptune Terminals and the Surrey Fraser Docks for the purpose of increasing coal exports is the wrong decision for Vancouver, and for BC. Sending coal overseas increases the marine traffic in an already congested Haro Strait/ Juan de Fuca Strait, giving greater chances of collision with other vessels and endangering the marine environment. The coal exports are used for thermal as well as coking coal, but all of it is burnt. This increases the amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere further increasing the greenhouse gases that are ever-increasingly warming the planet causing sea levels to rise. Your decision should be delayed pending a broad and thorough public consultation process as such an expansion proposal will eventually negatively affect so many in British Columbia's coastal communities.

Sincerely - Mr. Rafe Sunshine, Victoria

Greetings:

I request that the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough scientific and public consultation.

Please consider the environmental implications of expanding this very harmful industry in your decision making process. If you have insufficient information to make a considered decision on this matter, please schedule more time for input, because the information is readily accessible.

We can no longer, as a species, support the kind of planning that privatizes the profits from such ventures, while socializing the risk. This industry is a leading contributor of pollutants that cause climate change, and millions of defenceless people around the world are impacted by this decision.

The fact that a very tiny group of people will make immense profits at the expense of the rest of humanity does not justify supporting these applications.

If you are responsible for making this decision, please act responsibly.

Sincerely

Chris Dixon, Salt Spring Island

Opposed to coal port expansion

To those in power who can make a difference

Please do not facilitate an increase in coal export. An expansion to the port is not the right direction for solving the environmental problems we all face as a society. We all need to make responsible decisions in our daily lives-at work and at home. Considering the latest numbers released on green house gases(a rise of 20% in the last decade) which far exceeded any predictions, we need to consider out energy options. Use reduction is key, not expansion to promote the use of dirty energy.

Please make responsible decisions based on the well being of our planet-the place we all have to live and share.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

clinton swanson

Dear BOD -

I want to register my opposition to the expansion of coal exports from Port Metro Vancouver. Climate change is a huge threat to the future of my children and grandchildren. We can't pretend that we are not part of the problem.

sincerely,

Ken Madsen

To the Board of Directors, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority.

All of my family members and I are extremely concerned about the expansion of coal exporting via the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority jurisdiction. We wonder how, under your statutory mandate, you can possibly approve the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks proposals.

We are requesting you to delay any decision on those proposals.

We also request that you provide public access to your proceedings, and public transparency for your governance.

We must insist that you report publicly as to the criteria you are using to determine the public interest and the benefits to Canadians when you exercise your authority.

You call on you to publish on your website, your criteria and your reasons for taking actions and granting permits.

Please tell, by return e-mail, what environmental considerations you undertake when evaluating and determining proposals such as those by Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks.

Regarding the export of coal, what specific scientific expertise and advice are you seeking and considering as part of your authority.

What do you consider to be your responsibility vis a vis the public interest of Canadians for aiding in the increased use of coal?

Sincerely,

Colleen Ann Fee

Dear Metro Vancouver port staff,

I am writing today to express my concerns about two tenant-led project proposals currently under review: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion.

As I understand it, if approved, these two projects will increase coal exports from the Port Authority by up to 14 million metric tonnes (Mt) per year. This will bring the Port Authority's coal export capacity up to a staggering 55 to 59 Mt per year, making it the largest coal exporter in North America. Converted into global warming emissions, this volume of exported coal will release, when burned, more than 100 Mt of CO2 emissions per year, a volume of global warming pollution much larger than all the emissions within BC each year, and more than that associated with oil exports from the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline.

As we are sure you know, the Northern Gateway pipeline proposal has been submitted to intense scrutiny through a broad public review process, and has received extensive media coverage. In contrast, the proposals now before the Port Authority have received little attention until quite recently, even though, when considered cumulatively, they have similarly significant implications for our climate and future generations.

This is a problem that we call on you to correct.

The mandate of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority states that it is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." I am writing to you today to insist that these proposals are not in the best interests of Canadians, nor anyone else. They will by their very nature hasten the onset of dangerous climate change, which poses a clear threat to human health and well-being. I ask that you acknowledge that you cannot legitimately claim that these projects have broad public support, because you have not adequately informed the general public about their existence nor sufficiently invited the public to provide comment on their impacts.

To rectify this failure to meet your mandate, the Port Authority should take the following steps:

1. Delay any decision making on either project application;

2. Inform the general public of Metro Vancouver of the scope of these projects, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and publicly tabulating their input;

3. Incorporate explicit consideration of the global climate change impacts of project proposals into the decision making process for these and all future projects.

The International Energy Agency, the World Meteorological Association and the United Nations have all recently released warnings that we are not doing enough to reduce global warming emissions, and that the opportunity to avoid catastrophic runaway climate change is rapidly closing. Given all that is at stake, the Port Authority has an ethical obligation to pause and seriously reconsider these two coal export proposals and to re-evaluate its decision making processes.

We look forward to your public response to these requests.

Sincerely,

Laura Cornish, Vancouver

To the Board of Directors:

I am writing you to stop the burning of coal and stop any expansion of such. In addition, I would also like to ask the Port Authority to delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation. Thanks for your consideration.

Dulcy Wilson

To: Board of Directors, Port of Metro Vancouver

I am writing today to express my objection to two project proposals currently under review by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion.

My objections are well summarized in the following letter recently sent to your Board by a large group of concerned citizens:

"If approved, these two projects will increase coal exports from the Port Authority by up to 14 million metric tonnes (Mt) per year. This will bring the Port Authority's coal export capacity up to a staggering 55 to 59 Mt per year, making it the largest coal exporter in North America. Converted into global warming emissions, this volume of exported coal will release, when burned, more than 100 Mt of CO2 emissions per year, a volume of global warming pollution much larger than all the emissions within BC each year, and more than that associated with oil exports from the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline.

As we are sure you know, the Northern Gateway pipeline proposal has been submitted to intense scrutiny through a broad public review process, and has received extensive media coverage. In contrast, the proposals now before the Port Authority have received little attention until quite recently, even though, when considered cumulatively, they have similarly significant implications for our climate and future generations.

This is a problem that we call on you to correct.

The mandate of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority states that it is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." We write to you today to insist that these proposals are not in the best interests of Canadians, nor anyone else. They will by their very nature hasten the onset of dangerous climate change, which poses a clear threat to human health and well-being. We also ask that you acknowledge that you cannot legitimately claim that these projects have broad public support, because you have not adequately informed the general public about their existence nor sufficiently invited the public to provide comment on their impacts.

To rectify this failure to meet your mandate, we ask that the Port Authority take the following steps:

1. Delay any decision making on either project application;

2. Inform the general public of Metro Vancouver of the scope of these projects, and develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and publicly tabulating their input;

3. Incorporate explicit consideration of the global climate change impacts of project proposals into the decision making process for these and all future projects.

The International Energy Agency, the World Meteorological Association and the United Nations have all recently released warnings that we are not doing enough to reduce global warming emissions, and that the opportunity to avoid catastrophic runaway climate change is rapidly closing. Given all that is at stake, the Port Authority has an ethical obligation to pause and seriously reconsider these two coal export proposals and to re-evaluate its decision making processes."

The International Energy Agency has recently warned that any new fossil fuel infrastructure development will seriously compromise if not eliminate any hope of keeping our global temperature increase below the two degree mark, widely recognized by climate science as being the maximum limit that our global ecosystems could survive before dangerous feedback loops are set in motion with potentially catastrophic and irreversible consequences. Coal, both thermal and metallurgical, should be the highest priority for phasing out consequently the proposed expansion represents a lemming-like rush towards the brink for all of us, as C02 emissions know no national boundaries. No matter how you cut it, coal is our dirtiest fuel and any attempt to rationalize it's expanded use or export as you are currently considering, will be seen in retrospect as the height of not just folly, but insanity. Make no mistake, the stakes you are gambling with have never been higher and the future of your children as well as ours is on the line. To make the argument that you have no mandate to consider such implications of your policies is not only specious but in my view an act of criminal negligence. History can be a harsh judge of such narrow-minded and self-serving decisions but I fear that we are about to learn that nature can be even harsher. I strongly urge you for once to look beyond the all-powerful profit motive and consider the possibility that you might have a moral responsibility to safeguard the survival of future generations. That the buck really does stop with you and there is nowhere else to pass it.

sincerely,

Fred Kay, North Vancouver

For the attention of the Board of Directors: no coal export expansion

Hello

As an emergency medicine physician I try to save lives.

The continued export and burning of Coal will destroy our planetary ecosystem.

The science is irrefutable, and 4 degrees by 2050 is possible, and increasingly likely. The ramifications are the destruction of civilization and perhaps humanity.

Would you please look up from your balance sheets and listen to the scientists?

To increase coal transportation through Vancouver is folly of the highest order.

Best Regards

Dr G Kenney Bsc MD CCFP EM

To the decision-makers at Port Metro Vancouver:

I read with considerable alarm the proposals to expand coal exports within the Metro Vancouver region. Global climate policy is at a pivotal juncture with the US in a strong position to negotiate a possible emissions treaty with China following the recent American transition to shale gas and subsequent reduction in emissions. The progress which might legitimately end the years of defeat and obstructionism at global negotiating tables will be swept away with the stroke of a pen if American coal is exported to overseas markets. As the obvious export point we in Vancouver are presented an opportunity to punch far above our weight, either working towards a clean future, or locking in decades of dirty emissions in tremendous amounts. We have seen the local effects of climate change on our forestry industry already via the pine beetle; climate change will bring much greater disasters upon us. This decision may well be the most important North American climate policy decision made this year. I have elaborated the point here:

Given the global importance of this issue I urge you to delay any decision on expansion of coal exports, take steps to inform the broad public about these proposals, develop and implement a public consultation process, and implement a framework that includes global climate change impacts into the decision-making process.

Respectfully yours,

Paul Teehan, PhD Candidate, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia

Please say "No" to the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Transfer Coal Facility and Neptune Terminal Coal Upgrades!

Lilian Chau, Senior Planner
Tim Blair, Planner
Planning and Development Department
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority
CC: Port Cities Committee, Metro Vancouver

Dear Ms Chau and Mr.Blair,

I am writing today to voice my objection to the proposed expansion of coal export facilities of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority: the Neptune Terminals Upgrades and the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility.

If these upgrades are approved it will bring the Port Authority's coal exporting capacity up to between 55 and 59 Mt per year, making it the largest coal exporter in North America. When this amount of coal is burned it will release more than 100 Mt of global warming CO2 emissions annually. This amount of climate destabilizing pollution is greater than all the emissions within B.C. each year and more than that associated with the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline.

Even though this coal will not be burned in B.C., these exports will enable the burning of fossil fuels creating the resulting greenhouse gas emissions, and therefore should not be excluded from the province's reporting on emissions as is currently the case.

The stated mandate of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians."

Hundreds of tonnes of hazardous and cancer-causing coal dust are released into the surrounding environment every year from terminals like the one at Roberts Bank. Increased coal hanling will make this worse. In addition to danger to human survival posed by catastrophic climate change, these proposals are not in "the best interests of Canadians."

While other resource projects such as the Northern Gateway pipeline are required to undergo extensive reviews and public consultation processes, the proposed expansion of coal exports has had scant media coverage, and notification to and consultation with the general public has been minimal. Therefore the Port Authority cannot justifiably claim to be operating "with broad public support,"

For the reasons listed I ask that the Port Authority to:

1. Deny approval to expand coal handling capacities at the Neptune Terminals Upgrades and the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility.

2. Incorporate explicit consideration of the global climate change impacts of project proposals into the decision making process for all future projects

The International Energy Association, The World Meteorological Association, the United Nations and the World Bank have all recently released warnings that we are not doing enough to reduce global warming emissions and the opportunity to avoid catastrophic runaway climate change is rapidly closing. The Port Authority has a moral responsibility to reject these coal export proposals and change its decision making processes.

Like many others who have written to you, I anticipate your public response to these requests.

Sincerely,

Paul R. Craik, Vancouver, B.C.

To whom it may concern,

I write to express my concern that coal exports are to be increased in the near future. I have considerable concern that our climate is changing as a result of the effects of humans, and that the burning of coal shall continue this trend. I would like British Columbia to be part of the force for positive change: a move away from toxic energy sources. I do not want the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority to be increasing exports of coal.

Thank-you for listening to my concerns,

Colleen Edmonds

To the Board of Directors: Climate-related concerns about Port expansion proposals

To the Board of Directors, Port Metro Vancouver

The current proposals to increase coal exports through the Port concern me very, very greatly. Burning large quantities of coal is already a very significant source of the carbon gases which are starting to change the earth's climate. Where the coal is burned is not an issue - the only reasonable course is not to burn it at all. To further increase the volume at this point is reckless in the extreme.

You are no doubt aware of the wild weather, rising ocean levels, food shortages and so on to be expected if we continue to burn coal and fossil fuels even at current rates. We are unleashing forces that will be far beyond our control by the time their full effects are visible, and Vancouver's coal exports are a central factor.

I understand that that the Board has no particular mandate to look beyond trading considerations. But by the authority of your position you are clearly complicit if you move forward with the truly destructive actions proposed for the Neptune Terminals and the Surrey Fraser Docks. The implications are huge for Vancouver, for British Columbia and in fact for the rest of the world. We beg you to delay any decision until the larger issues can be appropriately addressed and brought into the decision making. Let there be a broad and thorough public consultation that will raise these concerns for full consideration.

Thank you for your attention

Sincerely

Robert Nation, Duncan

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Hello,

This letter is to express my concerns about the upcoming discussion of the coal export expansion at the Port of Metro Vancouver. I would like to please ask the board to

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals

2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals

4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals

Sincerely,

Laura Albert

stop coal export expansion plans

To whom it may concern at the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority,

I'm writing to ask that you not approve the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion plans. Approving these plans would result in enough coal being exported from the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority facilities, that if burned, would add a serious burden to our already frightening climate change scenario.

Humans have already emitted enough CO2 in parts per million that we are past the point the climate scientists identify as giving us any possibility to avert serious temperature rises in the earth's atmosphere (350ppm). Climate changes that are severely destructive to human and other planetary lifeforms are now inevitable because the current emissions will set off a series of positive feedback loops that by their nature exacerbate the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere.

Business as usual, a sound economy, jobs, and other economic arguments that may be used to justify the port expansions leading to increased coal exports are not justification enough. If there is no habitable planet, there is no economy. To state, as the Port Authority has, that the a discussion of the climate effects of coal exports "belongs elsewhere" is irresponsible, narrow-sighted, and at this point in human history, immoral. We can no longer afford to claim that climate change discussions must happen outside of any given sphere of reference, particularly where that sphere's activities have direct impact on the state of the world's climate. The effects of climate change will permeate all human endeavour, mostly for the worse.

I'm calling on you to immediately halt all decisions related to the two proposed projects and any future projects that may result in increased coal exports until a robust public consultation is completed and public input is meaningfully taken into consideration. I will be attending those public consultations to voice my fierce opposition to the proposals.

Sincerely,

Andrew Rushmere

Dear decision makers, Port of Metro Vancouver;

I am writing you today to express deep concern about two tenant lead proposals for new and expanded coal export facilities whose approvals fall under your authority. The Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion must undergo a full review for potential damages to the local economy, the marine environment and global climate impacts. As the responsible party for any decisions regarding these proposals I therefore I urge you to take the following actions:

1. Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.

2. Take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.

3. Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.

4. Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for considering these actions, I trust you will keep the good of the whole in mind when deliberating on these proposals. Please keep me informed on the progress of your actions in regards to these two proposals. Thank-you.

Regards

Gordon Scott, Lasqueti Island

Are you kidding me?

What we actually need is less carbon burned. It's sort of a scientific fact at this stage.

Your job is to serve the public.

Why aren't you?

No coal expansion. Start moving in the right direction. The human race actually depends upon it. If you don't understand this, then you aren't qualified to have the job you do.

What you're doing will hurt many, many people. It's that simple.

AJ Klein

To Port Metro Vancouver,

I am writing out of concern about the proposal to increase coal exports through our port. I ask that you:

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and

4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for your consideration of my concerns.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Shaffer, Vancouver

Dear Sirs:

Two proposals currently before the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, if approved, would make Metro Vancouver the biggest exporter of coal in North America. In total, the region's coal exports would produce more global warming pollution each year than the oil in the Northern Gateway Pipeline. Given the urgent need to cut emissions to avoid a runaway climate disaster, these plans can only be described as madness.

It is essential that the Port Authority delay any decision making on the Neptune Terminals and Surrey Fraser Docks coal export proposals until there has been broad and thorough public consultation.

Sincerely,

Larry Sharp, Vancouver

Concerns about coal export expansion

PMV Board of Directors,

Below is an excerpt from an article titled "Vancouver Mayor Urges More Public Input Ahead of Coal-Port Expansion" posted in the Globe and Mail dated 5 Dec 2012.

"But Jim Crandles, director of planning for PMV, said there has been adequate consultation already. "Our direct response is that we are undertaking the appropriate kind of consultations for the projects," Mr. Crandles said. He said the Fraser Surrey Docks proponent sent letters to 1,700 residents in the area, informing them of plans, and PMV has been in contact with municipal staff in the regions affected by both projects. "So the community is well aware in knowing what kind of development plans that there have been," he said."

As President of the South Westminster Rate Payers Association I would like to inform you that contrary to the posted article I have not personally or as President of the Association been informed of the details of the coal port expansion at the Fraser Surrey Docks. I represent approximately 400 homes located in St. Helen's Park. I believe due to our neighboring location (please see attached map) we deserve consultation on this project.

Perry Arseneault, President, South Westminster Ratepayers Association, Surrey

To the Board of Directors, Port of Metro Vancouver:

We are very concerned about the possibility of vastly increased amounts of coal being shipped from the Lower Mainland of BC, and call on you to carefully consider your response to the Neptune Terminals and Fraser-Surrey Docks coal export proposals.

We firmly believe these decisions should be delayed until a full public discussion of the matter is held. Information regarding the scope of these proposals and their effects, both regionally and globally, must be made available to the citizens of BC. A proper, democratic process for inviting public comment needs to be established, and these comments must be seriously considered before any decisions are taken. Your role as managers of the port must be based on serving the public good, and this can only be determined through broad public input regarding all such decisions.

Our society cannot keep blindly permitting and promoting the use of fossil fuels which contribute to climate change and threaten the quality and future of life on the planet. We desperately need decision-makers such as yourselves to act responsibly and make choices that will help solve this global crisis rather than accelerate it. Please do not dismiss these concerns, and please think about the kind of future you want to help create for future generations. We look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Derek and Jean Wilkinson, Salt Spring Island

Re Coal Export Expansion Port Metro Vancouver - to the Board of Directors

Board of Directors, Port Metro Vancouver, Vancouver

Dear Board of Directors,

I am writing with regards to the recently announced applications by Fraser Surrey Docks and Nepturne Terminals with regards to coal shipments. I would sincerely request that before making a decision on either of these applications that you firstly make all the information available to the general public. Hopefully you would find it appropriate to engage in 'information sessions', with satisfactory advance public notice, outlining the scope of these projects, and how they would affect the local environment, such as water, land and air, and also how they would impact the 'climate change' challenge, Vancouver and BC is now facing. I understand that you have made the public aware that 'climate change' is not part of your mandate, but I wonder what your statement means, and I quote your website, under the heading, Air and Energy Action Program, "Port Metro Vancouver is leading the way for other ports to address air quality and climate change"?

Additionally, I request that, along with the above public information sessions you develop a transparent method for inviting and displaying public comment on the two applications.

I am copying my letter of request to several other recipients, including the organization 'Voters Taking Action On Climate Change', our provincial Premier, The Hon. Christy Clark, MLA Adrian Dix, the provincial and federal Ministers of Environment, the federal Minister of Natural Resources, and Minister of Transport, in the hope they would consider the scope of these applications, and whether they feel they would be in the 'best interest of British Columbians', Canadians and our world.

I would look forward to your reply at your earliest convenience.

Thank you,

Sincerely, Alan W. Cannon, Mayne Island

Coal export plans

It has recently been brought to my attention that the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority are considering two coal export plans which, if approved, would make metro Vancouver the largest coal exporter in North America. I understand that these plans are being made by merely a few people, without any input from the public at large. Since this initiative would negatively affect the public at large, and since your mandate is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians," I urge to reconsider this step and open discussion to all interested parties.

Yours sincerely,

Mary Pike

It's hero time!

Dear Port of Metro Vancouver,

It's your kids as well as mine that are going to live with the consequences of our energy choices. The "bottom line" of port business opportunities doesn't include that but we must.

Coal is one of the most climate damaging fuels in the world and we need to STOP burning it, not ship it to other countries where it will be just as destructive as if we burned it ourselves. You actually have the opportunity to get on the right side of history, to have bragging rights with your grandkids that you cared enough to understand the devastating consequences of climate change and, because you love them, you did the right thing. It's time to save the village, time to create a story that you can tell with pride because you stood up for them when others did not. Because honestly, voting to expand a coal port at this point in history just isn't going to cut it. If they ever know that you were in a position to slow climate change and you did not, they will return your favour by holding you in contempt.

If you can just vote "no" to coal port expansion, just vote "no."

If you can't just vote "no," provide an open and transparent public process and give us, the public, the chance to say "no." We, too, have the most important things in life at stake here.

Either way, its the right thing to do. The wrong thing to do is to see "business as usual" as a viable option because that will substantially (and knowingly) destroy the opportunities of your grandkids (not to mention mine).

No matter what you decide, have the honesty and integrity to include the science of climate change and the contribution of coal that would be exported in your analysis.

It's hero time!

Sincerely,

Carrie Saxifrage

Dear Decision Maker,

I am very concerned about the negative impacts to our planet of the upcoming coal export proposals. Coal is the most damaging of all the fossil fuels to the environment and health of all living things. Not only is coal mining dangerous, so is it's transportation (ship or rail) as well burning coal contributes the most green house gasses to our planet (Dr. Andrew Weaver, University of Victoria) Please delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals. Instead develop a transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals as well please inform the public of the scale of these proposals.

Thank you for your consideration of my concerns, we are all in this together!

Sincerely,

Susanna Kaljur, Courtenay

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Dear Sirs:

Here is my recent "letter to editor" of the Powell River Peak newspaper regarding a local Regional District councillors comments on Dec. 5th. It is self-evident of my opinion of not only his opinion, concerning the specific Powell River area possible involvement, but also the whole idea of expansion of our coal ports and the shipping of coal overseas.

Dear Editor: re: Texada coal shipments increase (Dec 5)

Dave Murphy's comments reflect exactly what's wrong in our world today. Myopic, self-centered, head-in-the-sand climate change denier that he clearly is, he says "the impact of burning coal on the environment have nothing to do with Texada... should be addressed to China not Texada." When 99% of the credible environmental scientists of the world, the head of the World Bank and the U.N. secretary-general and many others all keep warning about the human caused disaster we are right today creating as our legacy to our grandchildren and the whole planet, he thinks it's all o.k. because it may provide 25 jobs in his isolated Sleepyville.

As a supposed leader in your community, what is it going to take, Dave, for you to wake up? It's not rocket science! The problem has become very obvious and direct. Pollution generated anywhere affects us all, everywhere. I'm told pollution generated in China can be identified right on your little island here in coastal B.C. We're all in this together. Start supporting sustainable, clean sources of energy, Dave. It will pay off with much more than 25 labouring jobs and just maybe your and my grandchildren will be able to thank you.

Rev. Jordan Ellis, Nanaimo

Please, at the very least, become more open and accountible to the people of B.C. by 1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) take effort to inform the broad public of the scale of these proposals, 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for your serious consideration of these points.

Yours truly

Rev. Jordan Ellis

To the Board

I am writing to ask you to oppose the expansion of coal export facilities. I was born before the Mauna Loa CO2 monitoring facility was commissioned in March 1958 when CO2 was measured at 315 ppm; they measured 391 ppm this last October. The science is clear and unequivocal. The changes I see in the world's climate patterns today are alarming. Future generations will judge us on our action. Will you be able to say you did the right thing?

Please - do not expand the coal export facilities - or if you cannot stand up to the pressure, you could at least

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and

4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Sincerely,

Rodger Hamilton

Please deliver my support for the coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

I am a Texada Island resident. For the last 15 years I have seen our school shrink, our businesses are in decline, and if something doesn't happen soon to stimulate our economy, we will face an alarming loss of services. Please know that a vast majority of Texada residents support your new plan. We have a few squeaky wheels that opposes any type of change, ignore them!

Kathleen Boeriu, Gillies Bay

Please deliver my support about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

I am a resident of Texada Island. I completely support your plan for coal expansion, and look forward to the positive impact this will likely have on our local economy. Our island is an industrial island and in desperate need of jobs and industry. I know many people here support the proposed expansion that will include increased coal storage on Texada. Please know that for every knee-jerk reaction opposing this expansion, there is probably twice as much support FOR it.

Sincerely,

Bridget L Andrews, Gillies Bay,

Please deliver my support for the expansion of coal handling capabilities

I am a Texada Island resident and fully support the proposal of increased capabilities in the movement of coal. This practice of handling coal thru the Texada Island has been ongoing for the past 12-15 years. We are an industry based island and any additional work for local people would be welcomed in our community. The support of local residents far exceeds the concerns issued by a small segment of the population.

Ted Boeriu

Please don't expand coal exports!

Hi,

I am a working mother of two. I am very concerned about having a clean, healthy city for my children to grow up in. I also want to have a healthy planet for them to grow old on. Your plans to hugely expand coal exports through the Port of Vancouver will threaten both of these things. I am sure you are well aware of the toxicity of coal dust, and that having piles of coal moving through our port put all of us, as well as local ecosystems at risk. And looking at the bigger picture, there are significant climate implications of having that much coal being burned *anywhere*. The fact that it is being used in China is absolutely irrelevant. That is just as bad for the planet as burning it here at home.

I was shocked and dismayed to learn that these plans for the expansion of coal exports through our ports has had very very limited public consultation.

I implore you, for my children's sake, to do the right thing. Delay any decisions about expansion until the public can be thoroughly consulted on these proposals. In addition, any future decisions should explicitly consider the climate implications of these exports.

Sincerely,

Dr. Quincy Young

Proposed Coal Exports

I recently heard that plans are being considered to significantly increase coal exports by the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority. I respectfully request that any decision on expansion be delayed, that the public be thoroughly consulted on these proposals, and that any future decision explicitly consider the climate implications of these exports and the health impacts of coal dust on the surrounding communities.

Regards,

Jamie Marshall

Concern over the massive expansion of Metro Vancouver's coal export facilities

Greetings,

I would like to express my concern in the strongest possible terms over the planned expansion of the Metro Vancouver coal export facilities. The expansion would make Metro Vancouver the largest coal exporter in North America and these exports would release more global warming pollution than all of the oil flowing in the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. I believe that any coal export expansion of this magnitude requires an open, transparent and comprehensive public consultation process. As a resident of Vancouver, I would respectfully ask that you:

      Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.
        Take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.
          Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.
            Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

I believe that the requested consultation is absolutely essential if the port authority is to fulfill its mission to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians".

Best Regards,

Joerg Messer

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

The Port Authority's intent to take a decision behind closed doors regarding proposals on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal exports is both anti-democratic and injurious to the public good. Any decision should follow a full public disclosure and review since coal is possibly the single worst offender regarding both health and greenhouse gases at a time when we are at or past the cusp for runaway climate change.

Sincerely
and urgently

Stanley M. Gauthier, Parksville

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

December 10, 2012

Port Metro Vancouver

Dear Board Members

I am a retired environmental consultant/scientist - my last job was preparing a mine closure plan for Suncor Energy Inc. I quit when I realized that if we burn more that 1/3 of the known fossil fuels, we will destroy our climate and therefore our kids' futures. This conclusion is not an "environmental opinion" from some "tree-hugger", it is based on undisputable evidence from science. Therefore, it would be an act of gross disrespect and disregard to future generations to expand the existing fossil fuel infrastructure such as your plans to expand coal export facilities in Vancouver.

As I am also a parent, increasing the export of coal would be a crime against future generations - much like the action of Easter Islanders when they cut down the last tree and so doomed their society to an era of destruction.

I realized that you are in a business, that making a profit is important, and that your mandate is to exclude externalities like the cost of exporting coal to future generations. Well, I quit my job and have re-defined myself as a "carbon buster" and community activist. So you too can re-define your job description. And the reality is that a greener world will give all of us better jobs. Sure there will be a difficult period of readjustment, but common sense and collective morality demands that we all take this journey to a non-carbon society.

Please consider the big picture. If you argue to your bosses and the public that we all must phase out the use of fossil fuels in order to save our kid's future, then you will be taking a huge and much needed leadership role. You could ignite a vigorous debate that our existing corporations and politicians refuse to enter into due to a lack of courage and vision.

Specifically, I ask that you:

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and

4) recognize climate change impacts in the decision making process for all proposals.

Sincerely, Peter Nix

Environmental Scientist (retired)

Dear Vancouver Fraser Port Authority,

Re: news article "Coal export plans causing heated reaction" in the Georgia Straight weekly newspaper, November 29 - December 6, 2012

Although I understand and can sympathize to some extent your stance on the immediate impacts of shipping products from your port, I ask you to please reject this plan to "sharply increase coal exports." Even if the port's operations are "carbon-neutral", that is not a logical reason for the shipment of goods that are not carbon neutral. Of course, for the purposes of trade and economy, I do appreciate your position. There was a time when coal was not considered to be an unhealthy and contaminating product. We know differently now, and things have to change. The fact that the review process says that there are no "significant adverse effects as a result of the project" is, I'm afraid, untrue. Even from the local standpoint, I would suggest that there is potential for dire consequences.

Public opinion is very important and very relevant in this day and age because of unprecedented access to information. Public opinion plays a big role in many things, and it is becoming increasingly difficult and dangerous to ignore or discount what the general public thinks and feels, especially when that 'feeling and thinking' is backed by Knowledge. It has been noted that one of Canada's biggest stains on its reputation internationally, is the wanton disregard to the global climate change issue and the devastating greenhouse effects that the use of fossil fuel energy is having on the planet. This 'plan' to send more fossil fuels overseas to cause further environmental and social contamination and pollution is a big mistake.

There is no doubt that the Northern Gateway controversy has increased awareness of what is happening around here. It is a fact that the majority of BC people are very opposed to the Tarsands bitumen-oil being piped out to the West Coast, and to the proposals Enbridge, Kinder Morgan, and other companies have undertaken. This issue naturally bleeds into other issues, and the whole attempt to make the BC coast into one huge oil, gas and coal PORT for overseas shipping is simply unacceptable. The People will not allow it to happen. People Power is much stronger than Money Power. If Money doesn't accept and respect this fact, there will be major trouble.

Considering how national affairs are progressing in these times, I would not be surprised if there is going to be a tremendous backlash against the fossil fuel industry in this province. There is no reason (except money and greediness) why Canada can't be more proactive in using alternate sources of energy. There is no reason (except money and greediness) why these harmful and non-sustainable fossil fuels commodities are still considered, by certain 'powers-that-be', to be viable and responsible products to export. It is not true! And it is not for the "best interests of Canadians" ... certainly not according to global public opinion!

Too much is at stake here (people's livelihoods, the environment, democratic rights of those living in BC) and too many people are very upset at the prospect that this beautiful province would be made into Canada's shipping yard for 'dirty' products. The opposition will only become stronger as time goes on. Please do not be a contributor to this awful proposal.

Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to receiving your response.

Respectfully,

Frances Dietz

To all Port decision makers:

Because we all live in this area, and on this planet any huge and negative proposals should be considered by all concerned not just the few who will benefit financially. That being the case please delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals and inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals. Also a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals is required and to incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

The negative impacts of the existing port is part of the environmental climate change problem so any expansions will only make the world wide situation worse. If it was drugs then we are the traffickers; trafficking the bad stuff and responsible for the horrific outcome, but with no conscience.

Coal is not only the main fuel responsible for climate change but also responsible for illness from toxic fumes, contamination of farmland and filth. Any shipping disasters have negative effects on the ocean, and sea life and increasing shipping increases the likely hood of more accidents. People world wide are fighting the use of coal for those many negative reasons so we should be leaders and stand up for the rights of the people and the world to make it safer and cleaner.

If any of you have children or grandchildren please consider their future, not the greed for money but their very well being and the welfare of all the future generations.

Thanks for taking positive action for our environment and life! WITHOUT A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT THERE IS NO ECONOMY OR LIFE!

Marilyn McClelland, Fanny Bay

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Hello,

I'm writing to express my concerns about the coal terminal expansion plans. I find it hard to believe that there are plans being considered to use public funds to build a facility whose utility is very much in question. There is a movement building, on a global scale, to stop the burning of coal. The same tactics that helped end apartheid in South Africa are being brought to bear against the coal industry. Every day, every storm, every melting iceberg adds strength to a movement that has science on it's side. The only opposition is based on greed and willful ignorance. Please don't waste our money building a facility that will never be used.

Mike Mesford

coal, nasty stuff...

I grew up shoveling coal into our furnace every winter -- for many years. The affects of coal, and coal dust take their human toll, so why do "we" insist on promulgating this dastardly, unnecessary abomination upon the population? As I see the game being played out, some reap hugh profits while the majority reap a whirl-wind of ill health and sooner than you think, a looming climate disaster will be catastrophic for everyone.

Dale Babcook

Dear Board of Directors

I'm writing to request that you:

a) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

b) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

c) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals,

d) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

e) consider the environment in your decisions rather than sacrificing it to making more money.

Clare Carver

Dear Port of Vancouver,

I am writing to ask you not to accept any proposal that would increase the throughput of exported coal from the Port of Vancouver.

You must surely be aware that the combustion of fossil fuels at current global rates of consumption presents a real and present danger to the future of this planet, and that coal is the most carbon-intense fossil fuel. For that reason, many people feel that increasing coal exports would represent a crime against humanity, since in the long term this will only increase human mortality and suffering. Rising sea levels, extreme weather events including both flood and drought, and crop losses, are no longer hypothetical changes caused by the release of more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere; we are seeing these changes unfold in our lifetimes. Please do not be an accomplice in causing these planetary disturbances.

We acknowledge that coal will always have a place in some industrial processes, such as steel manufacture. However the use of coal in generating electrical power and for space heating is unnecessary today as there are viable alternative sources of energy for those purposes.

In the area of my residence, there is also rising alarm over the possibility of using Texada Island as a coal port. Please, please do not support such a decision.

sincerely,

Chris Aikman, Hornby Island

Terminal Expansion to Accept and Export Additional Coal at Roberts Bank, B.C.

December 11, 2012

Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans

Dear Minister Ashfield,

Re; Terminal Expansion to Accept and Export Additional Coal at Roberts Bank, B.C.

Coal barged and dumped on beautiful Texada Island has changed our plan of purchasing property on the island. How many other potential purchasers will now be turned off. Will the property values decrease? I wonder how many tourists will want to visit Texada should this proposal become a reality. We really hope the residents, of Texada Island, Powell River, and Sunshine Coast, will take a firm stand against such a proposal. Can you imagine the black coal dust and the toxic nano particles blowing off the barges as they travel along our coastline. Black dust drifting over Powell River, Texada Island, and the Sunshine Coast? Will the polluted coal dust air affect your health, children, and your pets health? Texada Stickleback may be the rarest and most endangered fish in the world, so how will coal dust affect this fish plus the whole environment of the island?

How much coal dust particle spillage will take place from loading and unloading the coal? At the West Coast's largest coal dock, Westshore Terminal, an unforeseen 28 mph wind gust kicked up a flurry of coal that left a black haze in the air April 12. (Photo on line) Residents in Point Roberts complained that a black film is constantly settling on their homes, cars and boats.

If water is used to keep dust down, what happens to this polluted water? Will ground water be polluted from chemicals leaching from the coal? How will the runoff be handled during our many rainy months? Will polluted water run out of the barges and into the ocean?

What about accidents? Roberts Bank coal conveyor system destroyed Dec. 7, 2012, and tons of coal now in Georgia Strait. Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Ship+crashes+into+dock

This is a very serious environmental problem, and we are told, "There is clearly a long plume of coal dust in the ocean, and coal dust is harmful to marine life. It is harmful to salmon, to shorebirds, it is harmful to the aquatic organisms that live on the mudflats."

Powell River Director, Dave Murphy is ill informed regarding concerns surrounding coal as, no matter where coal is burned, it is a dirty form of energy and the leading contributor to climate change. Read here: http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Coal_waste#Coal_ash_and_scrubber_sludge

This movement of coal is a concern of the USA, and yes Canada is a good neighbour, but there comes a time when we must stand firm and say, "no more"!!

See what our neighbours to the South are saying:

Stop Coal Exports Through the Gorge http://www.gorgefriends.org/section.php?id=79Coal

Coal Export - A history of failure for western ports http://www.sightline.org/research/coal-export/

Once an "accident" happens, no amount of money and "clean up" can restore the area to what was there originally.

All elected officials, must be aware that land and water pollution at coal export harbours is both inevitable and potentially irreversible, and therefore look to cleaner materials to create jobs. To allow the expansion to accept more coal at the Roberts Bank port is certainly not in the best interest of the public or the environment.

Respectfully,

Vel Anderson, Taxpayer, Gibsons

Coal Export Decision must consider Climate Change

To Whom it may Concern,

You know the facts. You've been told them numerous times, by people far more educated and informed than I am. You know that while much of the coal exported through the ports is used in less carbon intensive processes such as steel production, some of it also burnt for power. You know that the burning of coal contributes to catastrophic climate change. You know that climate change will and is causing deaths and negatively impacting the lives of millions of people globally. These are facts. The scientific community is in broad agreement.

So, what are you going to do about it. You can't absolve yourself of the moral responsibility. Your decisions have impacts and you must be responsible for the complete range of impacts. We will not end the fossil fuel economy overnight and should not, for the sake of hundreds of thousands of jobs in the province and around the world. But we should not and cannot expand the fossil fuel economy without condemning future and present generations to climate uncertainty and disaster.

At the very least, this decision needs to be open to broad public comment. Moreover, if you are going to go ahead with this decision you at the very least need to take responsibility for the decision and call for the inclusion of coal exports in BC's carbon tax. This kind of political action has been taken by many fossil fuel companies themselves and is well within the scope of organizations which promote trade. Please consider these possibilities careful and think about the consequences of the actions you take, please.

Matt Hammer

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

To all of the above:

After the recent coal shipping disaster even under the supervision of capable people it is even more evident that any expansion of the Delta or Surrey coal facilities should not take place. With bigger and more ships any future accident will have worse negative effects on our waters not to mention the sea life who call it home and the fish that are used for food. Our waters suffer enough without further pollution from coal. These accidents do occur despite what the greedy corporations may say to whitewash the project, and accidents do have many negative effects.

Shipping coal in the first place is nothing to be proud of and has disastrous consequences world wide and we must take responsibility for that. Pollution, global warming, sickness and extra costs are the result of mining, shipping and burning coal and we should be ashamed to be harking back to the dark ages when we did not know any better. Now that we do know about the toxins released from mining coal, black lung to miners and pollution damage from dust to our health and to crops and fish that are eaten we have no excuse! Coal among other things is killing our planet and while it may not affect you it does other people and will in the future if continued.

If all the money spent on negotiations, administration, mining, shipping and burning of coal was used to create green, sustainable, safe, energy BC, Canada and the world would be a much cleaner, healthier, happier place. You can't eat coal or money and the sooner decision makers realise that the better all our lives would be. Coal is the liver of the earth and is needed where it is so it should remain in the ground!

Please delay any decisions on any expansions of the Neptune and Fraser Surrey Docks until much deeper consequences of climate change are considered and there is a transparent consultation with the broader BC public.

Thank you for your time.

Marilyn McClelland, Fanny Bay

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

Dear Sirs,

Please ask the Board of Directors:

- to delay any decision on the NEPTUNE TERMINALS and FRASER SURREY DOCKS coal export proposals

- to make a significant effort to inform the broad public of the scale of these proposals

- to develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, both present and future ones

- to incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for ALL proposals. This exported coal will release, if the proposals go ahead, more global warming pollution each year than all the oil pumped through the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. Coal dust is TOXIC!

Wendy Thompson

To Port Metro Vancouver staff and directors:

This email is to ask that you delay any decision on the Neptune and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals until there has been a full public discussion on these proposals, including of the climate change impacts of exporting the contemplated volume of coal. Furthermore, the Port should actively engage the public of BC on this issue, as it affects climate change issues, which are of relevance to all British Columbians.

Could you please clarify for me how, if at all, the consideration of climate change impacts and BC's energy objectives (per the Clean Energy Act) will be factored into any decision regarding the Neptune and Fraser Surrey proposals.

I look forward to your response.

Thomas Hackney, Victoria

To the Directors of the Vancouver Port Authority

Climate Action Network has brought to our attention that you may approve shipment of increased quantities of coal to the Pacific Rim through your facilities. Before 2012 an increase in coal shipments would be regarded as a management issue on the use of Port infrastructure, such as Neptune Terminals and the Fraser Surrey Docks.

Now that approach is not acceptable. You are all aware that coal is the dirtiest fossil fuel, belching more CO2 into the atmosphere than other fossil fuels. By approving greater use of your docks for coal exports you are facilitating a climate change crisis that is avoidable.

We will be following your handling of this matter closely. We will encourage grandparents in British Columbia to add their voices to our objection.

Yours truly,

Peter Jones

On behalf of For Our Grandchildren www.forourgrandchildren.ca

Concern over coal export expansion -letter to the Board of Directors

Dear Board of Directors,

I am concerned about the process that is being used to make this important decision about the scale of activities at the coal port. This decision impacts not only the neighbours of the port but also has global impacts in terms of facilitating more rapid climate change. Rushing on this decision that is so important does not serve the interests of BC nor its citizens well and needs to be far more open and accountable in its process. As such, I would respectfully ask that the Board consider the following:

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

2) make an effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and

4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for your consideration,

Sincerely,

Sue Maxwell, Whistler

To the Board of Directors: Coal Export Facilitates

Hi,

I writing to ask for an immediate moratorium on new coal exporting facilities and a phased-in reduction of existing coal exports.

Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) was first proposed by Svante Arrhenius over 100 years ago. Since then so much evidence has been amassed in support of this hypothesis that is is now supported by 97% of the actively publishing climate scientists. No scientific body of national or international standing currently maintains a dissenting opinion.

The science is clear that we need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80-90%. Which means we need to reduce fossil fuel use dramatically. And that means that we need to be systematically reducing the amount of coast we mine and ship. Building new shipping infrastructure is an unmitigated disaster for future generations.

Please do not try to on the responsibility to someone else. We all have a responsibility to do our part to reduce GHG emissions.

Rob

port authority coal expansion: an idea with horrific consequences

December 14, 2012

Dear Board of Directors of Port Metro Vancouver,

I am writing today to express my concerns about two tenant-led project proposals currently under review by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades | Coal Handling Expansion.

I have very recently leant about these two project proposals. I am appalled at the thought of such expansion occurring right here in Vancouver without any consultation with the public. These projects are not in the best interests of Canadians. Undoubtedly, they have the ability to make a few Canadians wealth in the short term but everyone in Canada as well as the rest of the world will suffer from this development in the long term. Burning of coal, as well as the other fossil fuels, is hastening the onset of dangerous climate change that will greatly amplify human suffering worldwide if not held in check. All carbon based energy projects must be phased out immediately. Your proposed projects do the contrary. By allowing the expansion of coal shipping, more coal will be extracted that will inevitably be burnt - adding to the already dangerously high atmospheric carbon dioxide levels currently found in our atmosphere. One does not have to be a climate scientist or even a scientist to link these simple processes requiring elementary school arithmetic**. The consequences of current elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels have already been well documented. They are grim and will only get exponentially worse if projects like the ones you propose are passed. Lets move towards the future with a clear heads and make decisions that move us down a path of negative and devastating consequences.

I strongly urge you to reconsider these projects and at the very least allow Canadians to have access to all information of your plans and allow them the opportunity to help make a decision. This project affects us all and will all have a right to have a say!

Sincerely,

Michael Krisinger PhD Instructor, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, UBC

** Current coal shipping: 43 million tonnes per year.
Producing currently: 90 million tonnes of CO2 per year.
Note: 1 ton of coal produces an average 2.07 tons of CO2

Proposed coal expansion will add: 14 million tonnes per year.
Producing an additional: 30 million tonnes of CO2 per year.

Add it up:

Total coal shipping: 57 million tonnes per year.
Shipped currently: 120 million tonnes of CO2 per year.

Now here are some world wide numbers to put things into perspective:

26 giga (billion) tonnes tons of CO2 are emitted annually (per year) worldwide.
Each ppm of atmospheric CO2 corresponds to about 7.78 Gt of CO2.
Over the past 50 years, about 55% of each emitted Gt of CO2 has stayed in the atmosphere. The rest (45%) has been absorbed by land or oceans. Thus, it takes about 14.15 Gt emitted CO2 to increase atmospheric CO2 by 1 ppm.

So those 26 Gt CO2 emitted annually worldwide results in a ~2 ppm annual increase of CO2.

Some useful conversion:
Note on units: kilo- 1,000 (thousand) mega- 1,000,000 (million) giga-1,000,000,000 (billion)
Note: 1 ppm of CO2 equals 7.78 giga tonnes (Gt) of CO2

Vancouver would be indirectly responsible for 120 Mt or 0.12 Gt of annual CO2 emission from coal.

Vancouver coal dependent CO2 emissions/worldwide CO2 emissions 0.12 Gt /26 Gt = 0.5%

Vancouver coal exports alone would make up a staggering half percent of worldwide CO2 emissions!

To the Board of Directors, Port Metro Vancouver:

I am strongly opposed to any plan to increase exports of climate pollution out of the Lower Mainland -- including coal exports from PMV.

As you know, PMV has just seen the completion of a huge increase (+12 Mt/year) in coal capacity and shipping from Westshore and Neptune terminals. This increase alone means an additional 25 MtCO2 will enter our destabilized climate system each year from PMV coal.

The total climate pollution from PMV coal is approaching 90 MtCO2/year. This is double the climate pollution released from the burning of fossil fuels by all actors inside BC. It is thirty times the emissions from the entire city of Vancouver.

Enough is enough. The social license to quietly push through long term fossil fuel infrastructure on this scale is rapidly disappearing along with our safe and stable climate system. . Instead, any further coal capacity increases must include a far broader decision making process to maintain the social license to operate. At a minimum the PMV should:

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and

4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Please consider:

* Coal is the primary cause of climate change and ocean acidification. We literally can not continue to increase the extraction and burning of coal and still have a safe climate system.
* Over 200,000 people in Metro Vancouver live at or below current sea level.
* Tens of billions of dollars in local assets are threatened by climate impacts.
* Most of our agriculture exists in an area threatened by salt-water intrusion.
* Metro Vancouver is one of the world's most exposed urban areas to climate threats.
* The Cohen Commission found that climate change was a primary threat to our wild salmon
* Half our pine forests have already been killed primarily because of coal emissions warming BC
* Ocean acidification is killing oysters and threatens much of our local ocean food chain
* PMV is already one of the biggest coal terminals in the world
* PMV has many other components of its operations it can focus on without having to continually and dramatically increase the climate pollution it enables.

Thank you for your time and consideration of this urgent issue,

Barry Saxifrage, Vancouver, BC

Dear Members of the Board,

I am extremely concerned about the fact that your port is expediting the export of coal, which is highly neurotoxic, and contains mercury, which is hugely detrimental to the developing brains of young children. As a fossil fuel, it is also a very potent greenhouse gas emitter when it is combusted. I commend my province, Ontario, for phasing out all coal-fired power plants by 2014.

Please accept these requests for making sure that any decision is based on due diligence:

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals
2) take all efforts to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals
3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals
4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thank you for your attention to this important matter.

Sincerely,

Barbara Falby, Toronto

To the Board of directors of Port Authority of Vancouver:

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals, 2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals, 3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and 4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Yours sincerely David Cox

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

I send this email because of my concern over increased coal exports from the Port of Vancouver. I am asking the Board of Directors to: 1. Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals; 2. Inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals; 3. Develop a clear and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals; and 4. Incorporate climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Mother Earth is waiting for us to make different decisions NOW. If not, we can expect more Hurricane Sandys and Johnson Landing slides.

Onni Milne, Vancouver

Please deliver my concerns about coal export expansion to the Board of Directors

I am writing to you today to express my concerns about two tenant-led project proposals currently under review by the Port Authority: the Fraser Surrey Docks Direct Coal Transfer Facility, and the Neptune Terminals Upgrades/Coal Handling Expansion.

You must surely be aware of the many environmental and ecological dangers of shipping and burning coal, despite your lack of willingness to address them. Not one of your archived speeches mentions these matters, and your Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Duncan Wilson, seems completely invisible in the public forum. In the unlikely case you are curious, I have included a fact sheet on the limited issue of coal dust. Hiding behind trade promotion as justification for your support of these projects (as you have done to date) may help keep you employed for a while, but there is neither broad public support nor are rapidly increasing CO2 levels in the best interests of anyone, Canadians included. Do your job. Respect your larger mandate.

I implore you to

1) delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals,

2) take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals,

3) develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals, and

4) incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

Thanks for taking action!

Brian McConnell, concerned citizen and North Shore resident

Concerns re: plans for coal exportation

Hello,

I am writing to express my concern and dislike for the two new plans for coal exportation out of the port of Vancouver. I find it particularly disturbing that the decision as to whether these plans go ahead or not is guided only by the Port, with no opportunity for public input. Surely you will consider the input you are no doubt receiving and continue to receive from concerned members of the public.

The Port Authority's mandate is to "operate with broad public support in the best interests of Canadians." I have not been informed of these plans from you, nor have any of my friends and neighbours throughout the lower mainland, and feel this does not then meet your mandate.

Contrary to what the coal industry will admit, these exports would release more global warming pollution than all the oil flowing through the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline. We are at a time where we should all be working together to minimize our impact on global warming, and these plans do quite the opposite. I am concerned about the air and water quality, that will no doubt worsen, along the coal export route.

I am asking that you please:

1. Delay any decision on the Neptune Terminals and Fraser Surrey Docks coal export proposals.
2. Take effort to inform the broad public (not just neighbours) of the scale of these proposals.
3. Develop a straightforward and transparent process for inviting and displaying public comment on all proposals.
4. Incorporate an explicit consideration of climate change impacts into the decision making process for all proposals.

I look forward to hearing from you and hope you will follow your mandate.

Sincerely,

Jane Thomsing

Board of Directors

You were hired to provide experience, guidance and reason to the operations and future directions of the Port. Yet we all live now with the elephant called Global Warming, which continues to alter our earth's natural processes to the worse, and we hear neither guidance nor reason from your board of illustrious leaders. Its time to stop and consider the consequences to all living organisms, human and otherwise, around the world, of adding more coal to the carbon fire.

Its time to rethink what fuels our economies and stop supporting the 1% of the wealthy fossil fuel extracting enterprises and think more about the vastly greater employment opportunities and healthier lifestyles and environment from upgrading our society to use less energy and create carbon free energy. This is what true leaders should be doing.

Canada was a leader in promoting freedom and opportunity around the world. Sadly with global warming, though we arguably have the highest moral responsibility to lower our carbon footprint, your form of leadership has turned Canada into a hypocritical, unconcerned and self-centered dinosaur. Once proud to be Canadian, I'm often ashamed of what we are doing. We need to show leadership in reducing carbon use. You have an opportunity to do that before you right now. How about using that experience, guidance and reason to help make us once again a proud nation and do something to protect the planet.

John Sainas P. Eng., North Vancouver

Coal Export Plans

Hello,

I am not particularly well informed on the subject of your plans for coal exports, but I have learned that if they were to be approved, these exports would cause more pollution than all the oil that would be transported through the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline.

Any simple steps to prevent a global warming crisis should be taken. Choosing not to go through with these plans is much simpler than resolving any number of problems that they could cause over the years. Please do what is best for the environment and not just the economy.

Thank you,

Rachel

Regarding the proposals to increase coal exports

To the decision-makers of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority:

I have recently learned about two proposals to increase the export of coal from Surrey (Fraser Surrey Docks) and North Vancouver (Neptune Terminals). I will not take space here to regurgitate the details of the proposals. We can agree that if either proposal is approved, it would lead to a significant increase in the amount of coal being shipped out of Port Metro Vancouver. I am writing this letter to explain why I am seriously opposed to these proposals on the basis that they would lead to worsened climate impacts, regardless of whether the coal is used for electricity generation or manufacturing steel.

I was born and raised in rural Manitoba and since have lived in Ontario and British Columbia. I am currently writing up my PhD dissertation out of UBC's Microbiology and Immunology Department. My field of research is outside of the realm of climate change science, but I recognize that our society's inaction on reducing greenhouse gas emissions is one of the most dangerous and pressing issues that we have ever faced. Everyone has responsibility in this matter. Advocating for action on preventing catastrophic climate change is as much my civic duty as it is yours. I am no hypocrite. I have made the necessary commitments to greatly reduce my personal reliance on fossil fuels: all that I buy is sourced as locally as possible, I do not drive a car (even though I have free and easy access to one), I have not flown in an airplane since the summer of 2008 (despite ramifications for my career), et cetera.

Now we need those regulatory bodies that are supposed to represent the interests of the public to make the right decisions. The physical laws that govern climate change will not distinguish our direct carbon emissions from those that are indirectly emitted from British Columbia. We as British Columbians have started to take steps to reduce our direct emissions of greenhouse gases. But profiting (financially, for the relative short term) through expansion of the port's capabilities to export fossil fuels, especially coal, cannot be justified.

I am using what may sound like extreme language. It seems this way because the usual voices heard in popular media commonly downplay the urgency of climate change. Canadians are being told how much economic benefit we stand to gain from the exploitation of our natural resources. However, the calculations of supposed gains are disconnected from the world we live in, never factoring in the deadly inputs to our world's atmosphere. What the academics have been saying for years is very different. I urge you to listen to the global community of scientific experts who are in resolute agreement that we must achieve serious reductions in our global carbon emissions. The course we are currently heading on will lead to changes in our climate that will barrage us with "natural" disasters and impair the world's ability to grow enough food. Some of the first consequences will be the deaths and insecurity of people from impoverished countries, those who had little to do with the cause of the problem. Yes, this issue connects to the same issues we abhor presently.

I am talking to you very personally now. Really ask yourself what you disagree with from what I have written. If you are unsure about the science, you should talk to the world's experts, who I know have already reached out to you. If you still stand behind the proposals to increase our reliance on coal, I ask you to honestly identify how you are rationalizing that position. Does your answer come from self-interest? Does it come from hopelessness? Should we as Canadians, some of the wealthiest people on this planet, be striving to further increase our wealth at the expense of our and others' future generations? You have chosen a job with great influence with respect to the matters discussed here. As a global citizen, please relieve yourself from the moral liability of the wrong decisions.

Please put yourselves on the right side of history.

Most sincerely,

Justin LeBlanc, Vancouver

My concerns about coal export expansion

Dear Mayor and Council,

Please take a stand against further transportation of coal from the USA to be exported through our ports. This material has to pass through Surrey! As Dr. James Hansen has made clear, all the remaining coal must be left in the ground to avoid catastrophic climate change. Thus it becomes a crime against Nature (and thus against human life, which depends on Nature) to burn more coal. Those who are enablers of this addiction to fossil fuels (such as Surrey allowing transportation through our city) thus become accessories to the crime.

Why is in our interest to supply fuel to China?

Why are we participating in this scheme which gives the US government pennies per ton royalty on the coal while they are suffering massive deficits? (Similar to how B.C. takes a reduced royalty on "natural" gas to undercut the price from other regions).

Robert McCroskey, Surrey

For the attention of the Board of Directors: no coal export expansion

To whom it may concern.

Please consider the effects expansion of coal exports from metro Vancouver would have on the environment that everyone shares. If we want to see a change in the world we must be that change, and the tie to stand up is now. When you vote on expansion ask yourself how our children, when looking back decades from now, will have expected you to vote.

Thanks, Caimen Shapiro.

Letters to the Editor

Get coal off the table at Surrey docks

New Westminster News Leader, December 6 2012

The article "Coal port expansion plans..." in the Nov. 30 issue of the NewsLeader was misplaced in the newspaper. This item should have been on the front page. The real issue here is the burning of coal (and oil and gas) and the CO2 load added to our atmosphere.

This problem is THE ISSUE of our times. The article refers to "climate activists" being "riled." Well, I'm no activist, in the sense of parading in the streets, and I have no children or grandchildren. Those who do have such descendants, however, will not get much approval from their grandchildren unless we (humans) stop destroying our air and instead start using the profits now generated by the fossil fuel industries to develop the sources of energy now available to replace most uses of CO2-producing fuels.

Write, email, tweet your political representative at all levels, and do whatever you can to pressure our so-called leaders and "captains of industry" to stop these destructive practices. Our grandkids' health, lives and economy depends on us making the right choices right now.

Colin Dover, New Westminster

Take a stand against coal transport

Surrey Leader, December 28 2012

An open letter to Surrey mayor and council.

Please take a stand against further transportation of coal from the U.S.A. to be exported through our ports. This material has to pass through Surrey.

As Dr. James Hansen has made clear, all the remaining coal must be left in the ground to avoid catastrophic climate change.

Thus, it becomes a crime against Nature (and thus against human life, which depends on Nature) to burn more coal. Those who are enablers of this addiction to fossil fuels (such as Surrey allowing transportation through our city) thus become accessories to the crime.

Why is it in our interest to supply fuel to China?

Why are we participating in this scheme which gives the US government pennies per ton royalty on the coal while they are suffering massive deficits? (Similar to how B.C. takes a reduced royalty on "natural" gas to undercut the price from other regions).

Robert McCroskey, Surrey

Silence greets coal trains here

Peace Arch News, January 9 2013

Editor:

How many people in White Rock appreciate the implications of Fraser Surrey Docks' proposal to build a new coal export terminal?

I have seen firsthand the big increase in coal trains heading to Roberts Banks passing along our beautiful waterfront promenade in the last few years. How is it that the City of White Rock has not taken a more active stand on this issue? With all the ongoing effort into improving our waterfront, doesn't anyone think that hourly coal trains might just detract from the ambiance?

If the new coal-export terminal is approved, there will be even more coal trains passing through White Rock with no obvious benefit to the residents of White Rock.

I have noticed that residents in towns and cities south of the border - e.g. Bellingham - have a campaign, "No Coal Trains," to try to stop the development of a coal port at Cherry Point, Wash. These people, supported by their elected officials, are not in favour of the increase in coal-train traffic nor the side effects of passing coal trains - noise/dust pollution.

This is completely opposite to the situation north of the border, where it seems not even a whisper has been voiced by White Rock council as a result of this ever-increasing coal train traffic. Maybe instead of "My City by the Sea" our motto should be "My City includes Coal Trains."

Hannah Newman, White Rock

Westshore needs to come clean

South Delta Leader, January 23

Re: "The dust up over coal," South Delta Leader, Jan. 18

Did Westshore Terminals' Denis Horgan have his tongue firmly stuck in his cheek when he told your reporter that "coal is a naturally occuring mineral. It is not toxic?"

Agreed, coal is natural matter, but its dust is toxic, just as dangerous as any dust or pollutant. Asthma, black lung, sillicosis are but three ailments caused by 'natural' dusts and other pollutants.

Deltaports' operators should take the money squandered on their public relations efforts to convince us that black is white and spend it on operating quietly, cleanly and considerately.

Being quiet, clean and considerate is the best PR known.

Light seeping through peoples' curtains disturbs their sleep. Coal dust is toxic. Diesel particulate is unhealthy. Noise disturbs people during the day and at night, when they need peace and quiet and complete darkness for proper rest.

The sooner that Westshore et al take their tongues out of their cheeks, the sooner they'll gain our trust and respect.

Greg Edwards, Delta

Government has made NV a dirty fuel enabler

NORTH SHORE NEWS JANUARY 25, 2013

Dear Editor:

In the past year or so, it seems that North Vancouver has been under assault on multiple fronts; increased oil tanker traffic, massive additions at the port, condo towers on Fern Street and Lynn Valley, and now the news that coal export volumes will be doubled at Neptune Terminals. The benefits to North Vancouver will be none; the consequences will be increased noise and air pollution.

I have wilfully thought that we might be getting smarter about the effects of greenhouse gases and that we can only get better at creating and conserving energy. On the contrary, we are just getting worse and North Vancouver is now in the path of unstoppable cravings for dirty fuel the world over. I never anticipated that my community would experience the impact of globalization's indifference to this extent. From our governments we get only short-term thinking and collusion; and no protection. What can be done to preserve our environment and our way of life? Whose city is it, anyway?

Robert Partridge North Vancouver

Rain, rain, come again

NORTH SHORE NEWS JANUARY 27, 2013

Dear Editor:

I never thought I would prefer the rainy days, but now I do.

Those are the days when coal dust from Neptune Terminals, who have just been granted permission to expand their current coal capacity, might not be flying right into our lungs. A big win for Neptune Terminals, a terrible loss for the residents of North Vancouver who live so near a huge, uncovered coal field.

Glance to the right as you drive down Third Street towards Park & Tilford. You can't miss it. And if it's not raining, hold your breath.

Lyn Flitton North Vancouver

Keep coal out of the Fraser River

South Delta Leader, January 31

Vancouver Port Metro are not satisfied in destroying the fish environment at Roberts Bank by not bridging the causeway to allow for the natural flow of tides and currents at the mouth of the Fraser River Estuary, they now want to place a coal pile miles up the Fraser River's mouth to the Fraser Surrey Delta Docks and destroy the Fraser River Estuary's very biodiversity that is so vital to the survival of the salmon fishery.

What insanity! Bringing coal trains from the USA through White Rock across Boundary Bay and along the border of North Delta's residential area to the their dock at the Fraser Surrey Docks.

I was on Delta's Council when they first brought coal trains across Delta to Roberts Bank and would have thought the locomotives were still burning coal, with the coal dust that came off the train cars. We fought hard to get them to recognize there was a problem and they alleviated to some extent by spraying the cars with water before they left the mine, but this would only last for a while until the cars dried out, then they tried another form of spray coating, which stopped most of it, but even to-day there is coal dust escaping from the cars. It was too expensive to put a lid on the cars and install silos to store the coal.

Then you have the coal pile at Roberts Bank that spews it's coal dust as far as the Point Roberts Marina on a stormy day. There a few if any crabs in the close vicinity of the coal pile and any that are caught in that area are generally infected with coal dust. They are about to spend millions more to try and prevent this from happening in an area that is somewhat isolated from the mainland. If this is a problem there, why would you put another coal pile right in the middle of a residential area and destroy it's livability and the delicate ecosystem of the Fraser River Estuary that is the greatest salmon bearing river in the world and has recently been declared a world sanctuary under the Ramsar dedication?

Will the powers that be not be satisfied until they have destroyed our very living environment? We must not let this happen.

Douglas Massey, Delta

Expanding coal exports short sighted

Vancouver Sun, February 1

Re: Coal terminal expansion will benefit the province, Letters, Jan. 28

The clearest answer to John Winter's extended praise for the coal industry can be found in three words: mountain pine beetle.

Mr. Winter states that the value of coal exports from B.C. exceeds the value of B.C.'s wood products exports.

While this is true today, in the early 2000s, before the main impact of the pine beetle, the value of coal exports were only at 15 per cent of wood products exports.

The effects of the pine beetle on the forest happened because climate change altered winter freezing conditions.

Coal is the among the dirtiest fossil fuels we have and, as such, a key contributor to climate change, whether burned for power or used to make steel. It is incredibly short-sighted to list the jobs and profits associated with coal production and export, but ignore the economically devastating impacts of burning the coal.

Nowhere is that impact more clearly felt than in the types of resource communities he claims to care about - the ones affected by the mountain pine beetle.

David Green Professor, Vancouver School of Economics, UBC

A new way of planetary thinking could start with saying 'no'

NORTH SHORE NEWS MARCH 6, 2013

Dear Editor:

Keith Baldrey's Feb. 22 column, Just Saying 'No' Not Always the Best Policy, is one more example of the narrow-minded thinking that is leading us towards the destruction of this planet.

The scientific facts are clear that the ongoing and increasing extraction and use of fossil fuels is causing irreversible damage to life as we know it, and that drastic conservation measures and changes to the way we use energy and run our economies are necessary in order to preserve a livable environment for us and for future generations.

Proposals such as pipeline expansions and increased coal shipments are completely contrary to the direction we should be heading. Even the Kinder Morgan expansion, which Baldrey argues will be essentially the same operation as it has been for years, will add a substantial amount of tanker traffic to an already busy port, increasing pollution and the risk of spills.

Opposing these projects is not easy, as Baldrey suggests. It requires courage and perseverance to stand up against the big businesses and strong governments who have the power and the money to push these projects through. But it is vital to have that opposing voice, and not only from the "environmentalists." We are all dependent on the environment for our survival, and as such we should all make the movement towards a sustainable and healthy environment our ultimate priority. It may seem contradictory to speak out against the very industries that have given us the lifestyles that we enjoy, but coming around to a new way of thinking is a process, and the change has to begin somewhere. David Suzuki argues that "it's incredibly short-sighted to think that a healthy economy can be maintained when the health of the planet is failing." Furthermore, former World Bank chief economist Lord Nicholas Stern asserts that "failing to bring down greenhouse gas emissions will destroy the economy."

It is Keith Baldrey's arguments that lack coherence and a recognition that real and dire consequences would actually result by saying "yes" to everything, not by saying "no."

Lisa Brasso, West Vancouver